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:) You enjoy being patronizing don't you Carrol.
Glad to help keep you occupied.
P.
----- Original Message ----- 
From: "Carrol Cox" <[log in to unmask]>
To: <[log in to unmask]>
Sent: Monday, January 12, 2009 10:39 AM
Subject: Re: The Dry Salvages - what's in a name?


> This is interesting! Its content is interesting, but of even greater
> interest is the discovery that when he chooses to Peter can engage in a
> conversation rather han hurl spitballs from the margin. Why don't you
> keep it up, Peter. It would immensely raise the tone of the list.
>
> In at least one instance (the one in my memory just now) when Eliot
> _does_ touch, at first positively, on a fully human tradition, he ends
> by reducing it to the 'merely' natural: the passage in East Coker which
> begins with early modern English to express the formality of marriage,
> and ends with dung and coppulation and death.
>
> Incidentally. Nancy mentions that Eliot had himself sailed off the coast
> of New England. Were those rocks more dangereous in heading out to sea
> or in returning?  Probably irrelevant, but I'm looking for something to
> support Peter's speculation on old vs new world culture. Do the rocks
> represent more of a danger for one returning to the new or leaving the
> new world?
>
> Of course the absence of evidence is not evidence; that is, the absence
> of "New World Culture" from Four Quartets is not itself evidence of
> anything. It just may be that the only 'natural' (and frightenting)
> forces he had encountered were all from his youth -- the River, these
> rocks. He never tried to scale the Matterhorn or go skiing in Norway, or
> even swim the channel.
>
> Carrol
>
> >
> > Another curiosity is that the other titlesin 4Q, while all place
> > names,
> > are also places with a constructed history, constructed by people.
> >
> > D.S. Is a natural place, on which nothing has been constructed but the
> > name.
> > It is, in fact, a natural elemental, quite in contrast to the other
> > places,
> > sugesting perhaps that he had nothing by way of human construction
> > in the new world with which he could identify in terms of his
> > rootedness. The culture of the new world is still too new.
> >
> > "ever, forever implacable"
> >
> > Can those rocks bear all that weight?
> >
> > P.
>
>
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