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So JFK's error was not using the word "Berliner" but using it as a *noun* (modified by the adjective "ein") rather than using "Berliner" as an *adjective* (no "ein",  like "Ich bin Berliner" meaning "I have the qualities [symbolically] of being from Berlin")?
 
 
Robert
 
----- Original Message -----
From: [log in to unmask] href="mailto:[log in to unmask]">Gunnar Jauch
To: [log in to unmask] href="mailto:[log in to unmask]">[log in to unmask]
Sent: 1/21/2009 4:13:11 AM
Subject: Re: More mindless blather from the Far Left: Was: T.S.E. at 101


Am 21.01.2009 um 07:13 schrieb robert meyer:

OK, now what is the German word for "Viennese" (meaning a person or thing from Vienna)?
 
Robert Meyer
 
----- Original Message -----
From: [log in to unmask] href="mailto:[log in to unmask]">David Boyd
To: [log in to unmask] href="mailto:[log in to unmask]">[log in to unmask]
Sent: 1/20/2009 12:16:14 PM
Subject: Re: More mindless blather from the Far Left: Was: T.S.E. at 101

It has to be said that, in my experience, the assumptions  I've read on this List about the proper meaning of a 'Berliner' are completely spurious.
 
Kennedy without doubt proclaimed, much to the bemusement of the natives 'I am a jam doughnut'. Any casual glance around one of Berlin's many bakery shops will reveal neat little piles of Berliners lovingly assembled for sale to said natives.
...

Dear Bob,


"Ich bin ein Wiener", of course!
And a real Viennese would add: "Schanster Diener..." (your humble servant).

Listen to Georg Kreisler's "Ausgesprochen schöner Heinrich":

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Cf6skNoo6eM&feature=PlayList&p=9E117FE1B8853013&playnext=1&index=29

"Ich bin ein gerechter, durchschnittlich echter 
Wiener, Schanster Diener. 
Verdien bei der Firma, Freundin heißt Irma 
Lehmann, die wohnt neb'nan. 
Und das ist der springende Punkt: Als ich ging in die 
Firma war Irma mir gut. 
Doch das Wohlwollen endete, denn Irma wendete 
Sich ab und ich hab vor Wut. "


Gunnar