Print

Print


Several years ago, I read a very interesting article in Birder's World
magazine (or was it WildBird?)  about bird vocalizations.  It explained that
many species of birds spend up to a year after hatching just listening to
the adults of their species to learn the song.  Then they spend more months
practicing and fine-tuning their song until it sounds just right.  Actual
studies have been done, recording young birds' songs over a period of time
as they refined their tune.
And, yes, certain species have an innate ability to sing the right song:
Brown-headed Cowbirds and even Northern Mockingbirds which do have their own
particular call, and some others that I don't remember.

Susan Eaton
Kirkwood, St. Louis CO., MO
[log in to unmask]

On Tue, May 20, 2008 at 4:01 PM, Bill Eddleman <[log in to unmask]>
wrote:

> They must have innate vocalizations, because male cowbirds have a unique
> and distinction vocalization, as do females. They do not imitate their
> foster parent's song.
>
>
> At 03:19 PM 5/20/2008 -0500, Gail Ahumada wrote:
>
>> Just returned from a vacation on St. Croix (a first), and, while watching
>> frigatebirds, bananaquits, pearl-eyed thrashers, etc., was asked by a new
>> acquaintance about bird song.  She said, "When a parasitic bird, like a
>> cowbird, lays its eggs in the nest of another species, what songs do the
>> baby cowbirds sing; and how do they learn their songs?"  That is, do they
>> sing some innate cowbird chatter, or the songs of their foster parents,
>> or what?
>>
>> And I said, "I have no idea!.  But I bet I know some folks I can ask."
>>
>> So I'm asking.
>>
>> Gail Ahumada
>> St. Louis  MO
>>
>> ------------------------------------------------------------
>> The Audubon Society of Missouri's Wild Bird Discussion Forum
>> List archives: https://po.missouri.edu/archives/mobirds-l.html
>>
>
> ------------------------------------------------------------
> The Audubon Society of Missouri's Wild Bird Discussion Forum
> List archives: https://po.missouri.edu/archives/mobirds-l.html
>

------------------------------------------------------------
The Audubon Society of Missouri's Wild Bird Discussion Forum
List archives: https://po.missouri.edu/archives/mobirds-l.html