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When I read this statement by Eliot it cancelled out the disappointment I felt after reading his Bolo verses. It's one of his finest moments. Diana

> Date: Tue, 22 Apr 2008 18:23:12 -0400
> From: [log in to unmask]
> Subject: Re: Earth Day (not at all 'Off Topic'!)
> To: [log in to unmask]
> 
> Thanks for sending this, both because it is actually about Eliot and because it raises the increasingly important question of religious responses to the earth.  Significantly, many evangelicals now support greater focus on the need to act as stewards of creation.
> 
> Nancy
> 
> >>> robert meyer <[log in to unmask]> 4/22/2008 4:32 PM >>>
> "We are being made aware that the organization of society on the principle
> of private profit... is leading both to the deformation of humanity by
> unregulated industrialism, and to the exhaustion of natural resources, and
> that a good deal of our material progress is a progress for which
> succeeding generations may have to pay dearly....  [A] wrong attitude
> towards nature... implies a wrong attitude towards God, and that the
> consequence is an inevitable doom.  For a long time we have believed in
> nothing but the values arising in a mechanized, commercialized, urbanized
> way of life: it would be as well for us to face the permanent conditions
> upon which God allows us to live upon this planet."
> 
> TS Eliot, 1939 
> from: "The Idea of a Christian Society" 

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