Nancy and CR: Let's not overlook Eliot's use of language as expression in and of itself. Very much as Joyce allowed language to speak in its many voices, none of which were his, Eliot allowed the spirit of his age to speak through popular songs, English dialects and language from other cultures. This is a radical modernist innovation with regard to the subjective lyric; it de-centralizes and polyvocalizes expressiveness. Diana

> Date: Tue, 18 Mar 2008 18:46:30 -0400
> From: [log in to unmask]
> Subject: Re: Inventions of the March Hare ( Was Re: EASTER)
> To: [log in to unmask]
>
> I don't see why "artefact." Poetry is not simply elevated feeling; it is the experience of the full range of life. And there is nothing limiting in reading an experience of feeling "mad" or depersonalized. These feelings are human.
>
> Interestingly, many early reviewers of Eliot praised him precisely for offering the "naked" truth of experience.
> Nancy
>
> >>> Chokh Raj <[log in to unmask]> 3/18/2008 12:56 PM >>>
> The Man and the Poet / The Experience and The Poetry / The Fact and the Artefact
>
>
> Very well said. I never meant limiting the connotations of such an experience
> to mystical/spiritual. You're right, sometimes the original experience by itself
> is far too valuable as artefact. It should not, however, act as a limiting
> influence in our appreciation of poetry.
>
> As for Hieronymo, the poet may not have intended a complete
> correspondence with the textual character -- maybe he was
> interested in only one aspect of him.
>
> Many thanks.
>
> CR
>
>
> Nancy Gish <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
> Many writers and poets have made great works out of madness, despair, melancholia, loss. I am not at all sure what it means to talk about a "mystic/spiritual" dimension being in some way always essential to that. Sometimes what the text does is genuinely evoke the experience itself. That is not a lesser or less creative thing--it may in some cases be a greater thing than attempts at transcendence or idealizing or philosophizing.
>
> Hieronymo in "The Spanish Tragedy" is not simply mad; his many voices have a carefully planned purpose, a rather horrible one.
> Nancy
>
>
> ---------------------------------
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