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>
>From:         Jane Lewin <[log in to unmask]>
>Subject: CFP: Nietzsche's Ecce Homo (London, 27-28 November 2008)
>
>Nietzsche's Ecce Homo
>
>A Centenary Conference at the
>
>Institute of Germanic & Romance Studies
>School of Advanced Study, University of London
>
>27-28 November 2008
>
>CALL FOR PAPERS
>
>Keynote speakers include: Keith Ansell Pearson, 
>Steven Aschheim, Paul Bishop, Lesley 
>Chamberlain, Daniel Conway, Carol Diethe, 
>Rüdiger Görner
>
>Friedrich Nietzsche's intellectual autobiography 
>Ecce Homo has always been a controversial book. 
>Nietzsche prepared it for publication just 
>before he became incurably insane in early 1889, 
>but his sister and literary executor, Elisabeth, 
>held it back until after his death, and it 
>finally appeared only in 1908. For much of the 
>first century of its reception, Ecce Homo met 
>with a sceptical response and was viewed as 
>merely a testament to Nietzsche's incipient 
>madness. It occupied a tenuous position in the 
>canon of his works, and a definitive scholarly 
>edition was published as late as 1969. In recent 
>decades, though, there has been increased 
>interest in the work, especially in the 
>English-speaking world, where R. J. 
>Hollingdale's 1979 translation gained it a 
>substantial new readership.  Two more English 
>translations have appeared in recent years, and 
>another is pending.
>
>Ecce Homo represents in many respects both a 
>summation of Nietzsche's philosophical outlook 
>and a supreme example of his stylistic strengths 
>and weaknesses. Almost half the book is devoted 
>to a reappraisal of his earlier works, often 
>from a highly partial perspective. He is 
>deliberately outrageous with the 
>'megalomaniacal' self-advertisement of his 
>chapter titles, and brazenly claims 'I am not a 
>man, I am dynamite' as he attempts to explode 
>one preconception after another in the Western 
>philosophical tradition.
>
>This centenary conference will re-assess Ecce 
>Homo from both philosophical and philological 
>viewpoints. Papers (in English or German, max. 
>30 minutes) are invited on any aspect of the 
>text and its contexts, for example its:
>
>genesis, composition and complex publication history
>key concepts and philosophical arguments
>historical (in)accuracy and relation to Nietzsche's earlier works
>intertexts, from the Bible to Paul Bourget
>rhetorical and narrative strategies
>hybrid generic status as literary-philosophical autobiography
>projected readership and reception by later writers
>contemporary relevance and relation to more recent philosophical developments
>theoretical interpretation (feminism, psychoanalysis, deconstruction Š)
>
>It is anticipated that selected papers from the 
>conference will be published. Please submit 
>proposals (max. 500 words) by 31 March 2008 to 
>both of the organisers:
>
>Professor Duncan Large ([log in to unmask]), 
>School of Arts/German, Swansea University, 
>Singleton Park, GB-Swansea SA2 8PP
>
>And
>
>Dr Nicholas Martin ([log in to unmask]), 
>Department of German Studies, University of 
>Birmingham, Ashley Building, GB-Birmingham B15 
>2TT
>
>INSTITUTE OF GERMANIC & ROMANCE STUDIES
>University of London School of Advanced Study
>Room ST272, Senate House, Malet Street, London WC1E 7HU
>Telephone: +44 (0)20-7862 8966  Fax: +44 (0)20-7862 8672
>Email: jane.lewin @sas.ac.uk  Website: 
><http://igrs.sas.ac.uk>http://igrs.sas.ac.uk

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The German Studies Call for Papers List
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