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>
>Subject: CFP: Cultural Memory (Canterbury, 10-13 September 2008)
>
>From:	[log in to unmask]
>
>University of Kent
>Kent Institute for Advanced Studies in the Humanities
>
>CALL FOR PAPERS
>
>Cultural Memory: Forgetting to Remember/Remembering to Forget
>10-13 September 2008
>http://www.kent.ac.uk/kiash/events/culturalmemory/
>
>Keynote Speakers:
>
>     * Professor Mary Anne Doane -
>http://www.brown.edu/Departments/MCM/people/doane/
>     * Professor Joseph Massad -
>http://www.columbia.edu/cu/mealac/faculty/massad/
>     * Professor Jay Winter -
>http://www.yale.edu/history/faculty/winter.html
>
>Cultural Memory is an area of study which has been extensively
>developed over the past fifteen years. Numerous conferences, books and
>series have been dedicated to it. This conference aims to raise the
>difficult question of whether - in opposition to conventional thinking
>- societies develop not so much through remembering the past as they do
>through forgetting it. We seek to turn thinking about modern identity
>upside down by exploring the relationship between the individual and
>the social or the private and the public in modern cultures. If one is
>to understand memory as a personal and collective reality then we must
>realize that `the past is not simply there in memory, but it must be
>articulated to become memory´ (A Huyssen, _Twilight Memories: Marking
>Time in a Culture of Amnesia_). If articulation of the past is
>forbidden by political or religious pressures or indeed by personal
>beliefs, then the past is erased from memory. It seeks to explore the
>traditional assumption that identity is about creating a story or
>narrative about one´s place in history or what has happened in the
>past. Could it be that rather than living to remember, as museum
>cultures might assume, we live in order to forget? Is forgetting or
>reimagining the past the basis of how cultures survive? Do we make
>progress in literature, arts and science not by remembering but by
>deliberately forgetting? Is creativity and self-formation of a life
>brought about by `abandoning´ the past - `abandoning´ what we already
>know in order to establish something new within a cultural life? We
>ask: Is forgetting a necessary part of functioning under the demands of
>contemporary modern life? Is the social order allowed to veil memories
>in order that society may survive by forgetting? To what extent is the
>construction of individual identity dependent on wider social and
>cultural life? Does contemporary life require individuals to forget in
>order to survive? Or is identity (individual and collective) concerned
>with inventing a narrative about the past? How do architects, film
>makers and video artists, fine artists, photographers,musicians, and
>writers contribute to the process of inventing, forgetting and
>reinventing elements of national and cultural identity?
>
>Related Themes:
>
>     * Empire and Memory
>     * Fiction of Memory/Memorys Fictions
>     * Myth and Memory
>     * Performance and Memory
>     * Place and Memory
>     * Religion and Collective Memory
>     * Terror and Memory
>     * Testimony and Memory
>     * War and Memory
>
>We welcome proposals from researchers in all disciplines concerned with
>these issues and themes including Anthropology, Architecture, Art
>History, English, European and World Literature, Film, Fine Art,
>History, Philosophy, Politics, Sociology and Theology
>
>300-word paper abstracts; 500-word proposals for panels including name
>of panel chair and speakers as well as 750-word proposals for Round
>Table Discussions in English should be sent electronically by 30
>January 2008 to Ana de Medeiros (email: [log in to unmask])
>
>KIASH, Faculty of Humanities, Marlowe Builting, University of Kent,
>Canterbury, Kent, CT2 7NR

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