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Moulting, like confession, is good for the soul.
----- Original Message ----- 
From: "Ken Armstrong" <[log in to unmask]>
To: <[log in to unmask]>
Sent: Tuesday, November 13, 2007 1:55 PM
Subject: Re: Impact of Literature (Was Re: Test of Time)


> At 11:08 AM 11/13/2007, Diana Manister wrote:
> >Eliot wrote:
> >"our lives are mostly a constant evasion of ourselves"
> >
> >Dear CR: That's my point exactly. Even when people want to change, to
have
> >more fulfilled lives, they resist even the skillful efforts of trained
> >therapists to allow repressed desires to enter awareness.
>
>    Diana,
>
>   Eliot pointed out somewhere that a neurotic person will not respond well
> to poetry, while presumably a healthy person at least meets that
> requirement. The people who "want to change" and are in the company of a
> therapist are probably among the former group.
>
> The case of people who want to change and have no call to visit a
therapist
> may be quite different. Seems to me it's no sillier to think that a
healthy
> person can profit in a human way from poetry than not to think that the
> afflicted would be resistant especially (not "even") to "trained
therapists."
>
>   It also seems to me that brutes need not apply. To be human is to be
> capable of greater humanity. A skilled, not necessarily trained, creative
> teacher helps.
>
> Ken A.
>
>
> >The process of integrating discociated desires into consciousness takes
> >years and years, because the repressed desires are regarded as
> >threatening, and psychic defenses are erected to keep them
> >unrecognized.  The notion that reading a work of literature would effect
> >penetration of these sturdy defenses is laughable. Diana
>
>
> -- 
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