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>"Turns" of the Century: Remapping the Turning 
>Points of Germany's Twentieth Century
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>German Studies Graduate Student Conference
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>Cornell University: March 28-29, 2008
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>Keynote Speaker: Lutz Koepnick, Washington University, St. Louis
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>Plenary Speaker: Patrizia McBride, Cornell University
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>To write twentieth century German history is 
>often to locate a "pre" and a "post," a cause 
>and an effect, in short: a turning point. But 
>perhaps the topography of these particular 
>moments has not been sufficiently charted. As 
>Martin Heidegger once commented, "the turn 
>[Kehre] essencing in the event is the hidden 
>ground of all other subordinate turns, cycles, 
>and circles-obscure in origin, unquestioned, 
>readily taken as 'ultimate' in their own rightŠ" 
>If we are then to question the nature of the 
>"turn" as a condition of radical change, what 
>are we to make of the alleged turning points in 
>twentieth century German life? Historically 
>framed: Where do we locate these turns-1900, 
>1914, 1945, 1989? Does Germany's twentieth 
>century begin before or behind these 
>well-documented dates? When and why did its 
>century end? Do residual narratives in German 
>Studies provide us with an understanding of the 
>significance of these turning points? As a 
>question of hermeneutics, this discourse also 
>lends itself toward an investigation into the 
>various turns in modern intellectual history, 
>including those linguistic, ethical, 
>theological, and psychoanalytic. And not to be 
>overlooked are the turns toward new forms of 
>mass media and technology which have had a 
>profound effect on the individual's perception 
>(and reception) of the events of this past 
>century. How do we situate the relationship 
>between these methodological and technological 
>turns and the respective moments in time to 
>which their points of origin correspond? To 
>summarize: What exactly is turning in these 
>turns? We invite varied responses to these 
>questions, as well as further reflections on the 
>nature of the "turn" as can be traced along 
>fault lines of literature, philosophy, or 
>historiography.
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>As possible points of departure, paper topics 
>might include, but are not limited to:
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>- Narratives of "Fin-de-siécle" modernism
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>- World War I and/or the fall of the Austro-Hungarian Empire
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>- The aftermath of 1945
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>- Construction and destruction of the Berlin Wall
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>- Formation of the European Union
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>- The "Wende" of 1989 and the fall of communism
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>- End of the 20th century
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>- Hermeneutic turns or Kehre in twentieth 
>century philosophy, psychology, and sociology 
>(e.g. Heidegger, Freud, Weber)
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>- Turns as "Events" in contemporary theory (Badiou, Deleuze, Derrida)
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>- Artistic transitions from Dadaism to 
>Expressionism to Neue Sachlichkeit and 
>everything in between, and before or after
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>- The "Turkish turn" in contemporary German literature
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>- The 19th century's turning into the 20th 
>century, e.g. Benjamin and his Passagen-Werk
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>- Media, young and old: film, radio, television, internet, and digital media
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>- Nazism's origins and legacies
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>- Turning toward the US: Americanization in German culture and politics
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>- Cycles and events in the life of the DDR
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>- The rise of critical theory: Frankfurt School, before and beyond
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>- Re-turns to Marxism
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>Please submit an abstract of 250 words or less 
>no later than January 5, 2008 to Ari Linden at 
><mailto:[log in to unmask]>[log in to unmask] 
>Abstracts must include a cover letter with the 
>author's name, title, affiliation, telephone 
>number and email address. Presentations are to 
>last 20 minutes and must be in English. 
>Submissions are accepted from graduate students 
>only.
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The German Studies Call for Papers List
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