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     Brad Jacobs, Phil Wire, and myself joined Josh Cussimanio (the area's 
wildlife biologist) for a day of birding and exploring around Four Rivers 
Conservation Area.  Of course the highlight of the day was observing the 
juvenile Wood Stork still in the same location it has been for a couple 
days.  Specifically along the "creek" or more accurately drainage ditch 
which runs north-to-south just behind the water-control structure at the 
northeast corner of Pool 2A.  Simply follow the central rut where the water 
flowed to reach the still standing water behind the low levee and then look 
left like has been described.

     Beyond the Stork we had a number of good birds though nothing to knock 
your socks off.  A few of the better birds included:

500+ Great Blue Herons, 1000+ Great Egrets, 2 Little Blue Herons, and 1 
Black-crowned Night-Heron
1 Osprey and 2 Mississippi Kites
1 Black-bellied Plover, 4 Upland Sandpipers, 90+ BUFF-BREASTED SANDPIPERS, 
and 15 Wilson's Snipes
1 Caspian, 4 Forster's, 1 Least, and 4 Black Terns
thousands upon thousands of swallows and cowbirds

     Just to give a few hints to those who may be traveling out there later 
this summer here are a few observations we saw or things that were told to 
us while we were out today.

For Shorebirds:

     Currently there are birds in the south-central part of Pool 4 (mainly 
Pectorals and Buff-breasted Sandpipers), northeast corner of Pool 4 
(Black-bellied Plover and others), eastern part of Pool 3 (the largest 
grouping in a wet grassy area), the southern boundary of Pools 11 and 12, 
the east-central part of Pool 7S (a grassy field with Pectorals and 
Buff-breasteds), and the western edge of Pool 19.  These areas should all 
have birds for awhile but as the water level continues to drop from the 
flooding Pool 16, especially the area around the intersection of Pool 15, 
16, and 17, should get pretty good.

For Waders:

     Besides the smaller groupings of birds which are in Unit 1 near the 
headquarters the main concentration of waders is in the southeast corner of 
the DU Presidents' Marsh.  There are well over a thousand egrets and herons 
in there that could produce something good if checked often.

For other waterbirds:

     As far as other waterbirds goes the best area was the intersection of 
Pools 15, 16, and 17.  There were numerous pelicans and cormorants in the 
area along with some geese and ducks.  This is also the area where all of 
the terns besides the Least Tern (it was in Pool 3) were along with a number 
of waders and some shorebirds.

     We also made a quick run through Schell-Osage CA this afternoon where 
the best birds were a Yellow-crowned Night-Heron in the flooded woods near 
the Osage River and a small grouping of shorebirds a little east of the 
Evelyn Johnson Shorebird Marsh sign which had some Stilt Sandpipers and 
another Least Tern.

Scott Schuette
Troy, MO


From: [log in to unmask]
To: [log in to unmask]
Subject: eBird Report - Four Rivers CA , 8/7/07
Date: Tue, 7 Aug 2007 22:25:54 -0400 (EDT)


Location:     Four Rivers CA
Observation date:     8/7/07
Number of species:     75

Canada Goose     100
Wood Duck     15
Mallard     25
Blue-winged Teal     9
Wild Turkey     1
American White Pelican     75
Double-crested Cormorant     50
Great Blue Heron     500
Great Egret     1000
Little Blue Heron     2
Green Heron     10
Black-crowned Night-Heron     1
Wood Stork     1
Turkey Vulture     30
Osprey     1
Mississippi Kite     1
Red-shouldered Hawk     2
Swainson's Hawk     1
Red-tailed Hawk     3
Black-bellied Plover     1
Semipalmated Plover     15
Killdeer     250
Greater Yellowlegs     5
Lesser Yellowlegs     25
Solitary Sandpiper     20
Spotted Sandpiper     15
Upland Sandpiper     4
Semipalmated Sandpiper     25
Least Sandpiper     200
Baird's Sandpiper     5
Pectoral Sandpiper     400
Stilt Sandpiper     50
Buff-breasted Sandpiper     90
Short-billed Dowitcher     5
Wilson's Snipe     15
Wilson's Phalarope     1
Ring-billed Gull     2
Caspian Tern     1
Forster's Tern     4
Least Tern     1
Black Tern     4
Rock Pigeon     1
Mourning Dove     2
Yellow-billed Cuckoo     1
Great Horned Owl     1
Ruby-throated Hummingbird     1
Belted Kingfisher     2
Downy Woodpecker     1
American Crow     2
Fish Crow     15
Horned Lark     10
Purple Martin     50
Tree Swallow     100
Northern Rough-winged Swallow     500
Bank Swallow     5
Cliff Swallow     1000
Barn Swallow     250
Tufted Titmouse     1
Carolina Wren     1
Eastern Bluebird     1
American Robin     2
Northern Mockingbird     2
European Starling     50
Prothonotary Warbler     1
Lark Sparrow     2
Song Sparrow     3
Northern Cardinal     2
Indigo Bunting     5
Dickcissel     5
Red-winged Blackbird     500
Eastern Meadowlark     10
Common Grackle     50
Brown-headed Cowbird     3000
American Goldfinch     2
House Sparrow     2

This report was generated automatically by eBird v2(http://ebird.org)

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