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James Miller's T. S. ELIOT'S PERSONAL WASTE LAND (1977) read it as an
elegy for Jean Verdenal and for a homosexual love.  He has reiterated
this in his recent T. S. ELIOT:  THE MAKING OF AN AMERICAN POET (2005), 
where he links it with "In Memoriam" and sees Verdenal as Phlebas.
Nancy


>>> Carrol Cox <[log in to unmask]> 08/04/07 5:05 PM >>>
As I was rereading TWL this a.m. I was suddenly powerfully reminded of
Milton's Lycidas. No particular echo -- but a sort of generic
resemblance. Both do involve death by water. Both do incorporate a sense
of social waste (Milton's more sharply), both point (again, Milton's
more sharply) to potential rebirth. Has anyone ever looked at TWL as
elegy? That would give poignancy to the opening line, linking it to
Whitman's "When Lilacs Last in the Dooryard Bloom'd."

Carrol