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Thanks for the clarifications, Richard. My source
did indeed mention chemistry. I couldn't remember
the types of entity which were being referred to.

I use a toaster oven. None of your  microwaves in
my kitchen, that I know of, anyway. :)

Cheers,
Peter
----- Original Message ----- 
From: "Richard Seddon" <[log in to unmask]>
To: <[log in to unmask]>
Sent: Thursday, August 02, 2007 5:18 AM
Subject: Re: Water in TWL--why?


> Peter
>
> Your analogy of resonance is appropriate.
>
> Resonance in chemistry usually refers to a molecule whose structure seems
to
> be able to fit more than one description.  It normally refers to the
> location of single, double and/or triple bonds within the molecule but
also
> can refer to "charge" location. The diagram which we humans use to diagram
> molecules can take more than one form for that molecule and we "say" it
> "resonates" between them.  Actually it does no such thing it is of one
form
> but that form cannot be diagramed using the rules we have for diagramming
> molecules.
>
> Furthering your analogy, "resonance" in a molecule accords that molecule a
> stability it would not otherwise have.
>
> A molecule can also vibrate as the water molecule does with the hydrogens
> bending back and forth about the Oxygen. This quality is what your
microwave
> oven exploits to heat your tea water.  Vibration in a molecule is not
> resonance.
>
> To be totally pedantic subatomic particles do not resonate.
>
> Rick Seddon
> Portales, NM
>
>
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