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- RBA
* Missouri
* Statewide
* 31 July 2007
* MOST0707.31

- Species Mentioned
NEOTROPIC CORMORANT
Tricolored Heron
White Ibis
ROSEATE SPOONBILL
WOOD STORK

Coverage:  Missouri Statewide
Compiler:  Joshua Uffman
E-mail:  [log in to unmask] 
Compiled:  31 July 2007

This is the Tuesday, July 31, 2007 Missouri Rare Bird
Alert, a statewide service of the Audubon Society of
Missouri, serving the birding community of Missouri
since 1901. The bird alert is compiled from reports
submitted by ASM members and other birders throughout
the state.

** NOTE: The report includes birds that are listed as
rare, casual, or accidental on the 2003 Annotated
Checklist of Missouri Birds (with revisions in 2004
and 2005).  Species that appear in ALL CAPS in the
“Species Mentioned” section are listed as “casual” or
“accidental” and thus require documentation. (Note
that some birds may be considered rare only during a
particular season or in a particular part of the
state.) The Missouri checklist can be accessed at:
http://mobirds.org/MBRC/MOChecklist.asp **

SOUTHWEST

An immature WOOD STORK was found by Nan Johnson and
Joann Garrett at Four Rivers CA (Vernon Co.) on
Saturday, July 28.  The bird has since been observed
by many with the latest observation being Tuesday,
July 29, when observed by Steve Kinder.  Directions
are as follows (DeLorme Atlas p. 42):  From Rich Hill
follow Hwy 71 south to Hwy TT, turn left off on Hwy TT
and follow signs to the main CA headquarters.  Turn
left immediately after the headquarters and follow
this gravel road for about 8/10 of a mile until you
reach a culvert where water from the open area on the
right pours down under the road and through some
willows into a large pool.  The WOOD STORK has been
observed feeding in this large pool and it has also
been observed perched in a large dead tree that can be
observed by looking to the left when stopped before
the culvert.  Additionally, Bob Lewis and Bill Reeves
observed (2) NEOTROPIC CORMORANTS take flight from
this same area on Sunday, July 29.  However, the
cormorants have not been reported since the initial
sighting. 

SOUTHEAST

The immature ROSEATE SPOONBILL found by Joe Eades on
Sunday, July 22, at Otter Slough CA (Stoddard Co.) was
last reported seen on Monday, July 30, by Clint
Trammel.  This bird has been observed at pool 21
(along CR 670) feeding with Great Egrets and also in a
field northeast of the junction of CR 679 and CR 691. 
Additionally, Chris Barrigar observed an immature
TRICOLORED HERON at the CR 679 and CR 691 location on
Saturday, July 28, but it has not been reported since.
 

Further south on Saturday, July 28, Joe Eades reported
(2) immature WHITE IBIS were observed feeding in a
rice field along Hwy 164, 1.3 miles west of the
intersection of Hwy 164 and Hwy TT (Dunklin Co.). 
However, on Sunday, July 29, Jim and Charlene Malone
reported (3) WHITE IBIS present at this location.

Information regarding membership in the Audubon
Society of Missouri may be obtained from Julie
Lundsted, Membership Chair, at 573-635-2976, Joyce
Bathke, Treasurer, at 573-445-5758, or at the Audubon
Society of Missouri webpage:
http://mobirds.org/membership.html


Joshua Uffman
MO Rare Bird Alert Compiler
St. Louis County, MO
[log in to unmask]
314.540.7382

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