Print

Print


Birds of note: Pectoral, Spotted, Solitary Sandpipers
   
  Hoping for Buff-breasted (this time last year), early Upland fall migrant/dispersal, or other shorebirds we headed up the Hwy 79 corridor toward Clarence Cannon NWR section of Great Rivers NWR.
   
  On the way up 79 a few Red-tailed Hawks perched on telephone poles.
   
  At Emerald View Turf Farms, we saw an Am Kestrel on the telephone wires and several starlings.
   
  At Keeteman Road Sod Farms north of Old Monroe we found large numbers of Killdeer, another Am Kestrel, a few starlings and E Meadowlarks.  Two baby Killdeers ran along the road next to us with their long legs, big heads and adult coloring...miniatures of their parents. 
   
  At Winfield locks and dam, the mud flats now extend to and past the bridge.  That's the good news.  The bad news: while we were there only three or four Great Blue Herons were visible from the bridge.  The Mississippi was still high, and we saw no Am White Pelicans, DC Cormorants or gulls.
   
  From Sandy Slough Rd we saw a few mallards.  A YB Cuckoo made us stop for a look and we sighted  3 or 4 Pectoral Sandpipers, 2 Spotted Sandpipers with spots, and a Solitary Sandpiper with a big eyering standing on a close mudflat.  It plopped down as we scoped it.  There were a few Killdeer.   Two men in a large official- looking SUV/Pickup drove past without stopping. Heading back across the farm roads toward 79, we saw numerous gatherings of Rough-winged Swallows on the wires.  A single Cliff Swallow was with one of the groups.  And another two Am Kestrels. 
   
  At Clarence Cannon the office building has now been completely demolished (the staff is using a trailer in the interim) and trucks are bringing in loads of sand in preparation for their new building construction.  The conservation agent told us we had little chance of finding a King Rail at this date and we knew chances were slim.  No luck.  A Mississippi Kite, a few Horned Larks, a family of Wood Ducks, Dickcissels, Am Goldfinch, E Bluebirds, Red-winged Blackbirds were only birds of note. While we had lunch, House Wrens fed young in a wrenhouse and a Common Yellowthroat sang from a nearby tree.  And another kestrel or two.
   
  With time constraints, we skipped driving through the BK Leach units on our return..
   
  Jackie Chain
  St Louis County
   
   

__________________________________________________
###########################################################
*              Audubon Society of Missouri's              *
*                Wild Bird Discussion Forum               *
*---------------------------------------------------------*
* To subscribe or unsubscribe, click here:                *
* https://po.missouri.edu/cgi-bin/wa?SUBED1=mobirds-l&A=1 *
*---------------------------------------------------------*
* To access the list archives, click here:                *
* http://po.missouri.edu/archives/mobirds-l.html          *
*                                                         *
* To access the Audubon Society of Missouri Web           *
* Site:  http://mobirds.org                               *
###########################################################