Print

Print


Sorry to waste band width,but I forgot to say
thanks muchly, as well.

Cheers,
Peter
----- Original Message ----- 
From: "Peter Montgomery" <[log in to unmask]>
To: <[log in to unmask]>
Sent: Saturday, July 07, 2007 1:50 AM
Subject: Re: Boundaries of Poetry


> Curious!!
> P.
> ----- Original Message ----- 
> From: "Rickard A Parker" <[log in to unmask]>
> To: <[log in to unmask]>
> Sent: Wednesday, July 04, 2007 3:06 AM
> Subject: Re: Boundaries of Poetry
>
>
> > Peter Montgomery wrote:
> > >
> > > I'm still curious about how a corpse can sprout,
> > > unless it's just a euphemism for the euphemism
> > > about pushing up daisies. Doesn't seem weighty
> > > enough, like the Conrad epigraph Pound didn't like.
> >
> >
> > Possibly the sprouting here means the disinterment of the corpse
> > by the Dog/Wolf.  It's not a pretty image and may be totally
> > wrong for the poem.
> >
> > I did some looking around for information on Adonis gardens and
> > found a nice page at
> >    http://frankhesse.com/engl/projekte/adonisgaertchen/index.html
> >
> > Frank Hesse (from Zuruck) produced an art project on Adonis and
> > did quite a bit of research (not cited though).  Here are two
> > paragraphs with sprouting and dogs among the themes:
> >
> >    The gardens of Adonis describe fragile clay dishes in which fledgling
> >    crops are yielded. Wheat, barley, lettuce and fennel seeds are
watered
> >    in the dark so as to produce pale shoots. During the Adonis festival,
> >    the women of ancient Athens placed the dish-crops on the roofs of
> >    their houses, where they danced, sang and played with friends and
> >    neighbours all night, in honour of Adonis.The Adonis festival begins
> >    with the rising of the dog star, Sirius. It's appearance, just before
> >    sunrise on the 27 July, indicates the start of the annual days of the
> >    dog. During these days, Sirius presides over plants and humans. The
> >    humans will suffer heat stroke and sunburn, while the plants and the
> >    cultures will be struck with sideratio. The siriasis finds its
> >    victims among the infants, the weakest human offspring, while the
> >    sideratio befalls the young shrubbery and plants whose roots are not
> >    yet strong enough to draw the indispensable moisture form deep in the
> >    soil.
> >
> >    The humans are half parched and dying of thirst, like those
> >    unfortunate beings, who are tortured by thirst and at the same time
> >    stricken with an aversion to water, because they were allegedly
bitten
> >    by dogs, which, due to the searing seasonal heat, have become mad.
The
> >    women are at their most lascivious at this time, and the men are at
> >    their weakest. Sirius sinks their heads and knees, and the heat dries
> >    their skin out.
> >
> > Regards,
> >    Rick Parker
> >
> >
> > -- 
> > No virus found in this incoming message.
> > Checked by AVG Free Edition.
> > Version: 7.5.476 / Virus Database: 269.10.1/889 - Release Date: 7/6/2007
> 8:00 PM
> >
> >
>
>
> -- 
> No virus found in this incoming message.
> Checked by AVG Free Edition.
> Version: 7.5.476 / Virus Database: 269.10.1/889 - Release Date: 7/6/2007
8:00 PM
>
>