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This is the title (from memory) of an essay published in Critical
Inquiry some decades ago, I think the author was (from memory) ?Michael
Kinsley?. (I have all the CIs but am too lazy to look it up just now.)
Anyhow, as I recall, he made an interesting case that texts are
incoherent, and that readers supply the coherence that is missing in the
text. Such seems to be true of TWL -- and the first reader of the poem
to attempt to make it cohere was apparently Eliot when he wrote that
blooming note on Tiresias. And seeing it as produced by Eliot the reader
rather than Eliot the author is an interesting possibility. 

Carrol

P.S. I haven't read very many of the endless posts fantasizing possible
narratives for Marie -- they evoke for me the old title, "How many
children has Lady Macbeth," or a recent flurry of posts on the Austen
list arguing that Jane Fairfax is pregnant at the time of the Box Hill
episode. It makes sense to me that a reader should formulate his/her own
sense of a text's coherence, but I am just infinitely bored by making up
new poems out of individual images, which makes any kind of even
provisional coherence impossible.