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A rich and compelling observation, Diana.  Thanks. 
   
  As for the Sanskrit passages from the Brihadaranyak Upanishad 
  -- alluded to in "Datta. Dayadhvam. Damayata." -- their relevance
  in terms of the need to cultivate these virtues is keenly felt all 
  through TWL. Eliot remarked somewhere that what distinguishes 
  a man from an animal is the sense of good and evil -- of "moral" 
  good and evil.  And the wisdom of the Upanishad lays stress upon
  "Damayata" i.e., Control.  And so did Buddha in The Fire Sermon.
   
  Regards,
   
  CR
  

Diana Manister <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
        Carrol and CR:
   
  Do you suppose it is significant to the scene in the poem that the players
  be members of the class that could afford such luxuries? The section opens 
  with a woman surrounded by luxury:
   
  "In vials of ivory and coloured glass
Unstoppered, lurked her strange synthetic perfumes,
Unguent, powdered, or liquid - troubled, confused
And drowned the sense in odours..."
   
  Following this opulence is the chattering neruotic woman and what
  I take to be the thoughts of her companion thinking of rats alley where 
  the dead men lost their bones and the eyes of the sailor, now pearls,
  his unexpressed reactions to her questions and demands. This is an 
  upper middle-class couple following convention to the letter:
   
  "The hot water at ten.
And if it rains, a closed car at four.
And we shall play a game of chess
  The ivory men make company between us
  Pressing lidless eyes and waiting for a knock upon the door". 
   
  Immediately juxtaposed is the lower class speech of the pub:
  "When Lil's husband got demobbed, I said--
I didn't mince my words, I said to her myself, 
HURRY UP PLEASE ITS TIME"
  Perhaps the juxtaposition of the affluent with the lower class is significant 
  in that the affluent couple is no less happy, perhaps less so, than Lil and 
  her husband. The ivory men echo nicely the ivory perfume vials.
  //I wonder if the Indian origin of the game of chess is intended as
  an association that would resonate with the poem's Sanskrit passages.
  My faith in Eliot's precision makes me suspect these echoes and resonances are intended, but to what end I can only speculate.// 
  Diana



  
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