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Where did you stop reading in this passage:

      The Auditory Imagination:
      =========================
 the feeling for syllable and rhythm penetrating far below the conscious
 levels of thought and feeling, invigorating every word; sinking to the
 most primitive and forgotten, returning to the origin and bringing
something
 back, seeking the beginning and the end. It works through meanings,
 certainly, or not without meanings in the ordinary sense, and fuses the
 old and obliterated and the trite, the current, and the new and surprising,
 the most ancient and the most civilized mentality. (118)
      ----------------------------------------------------------------------
--
      Eliot,T.S. "Matthew Arnold." THE USE OF POETRY AND THE USE OF
          CRITICISM. London: Faber, 1933.

Cheers,
Peter
----- Original Message ----- 
From: "Carrol Cox" <[log in to unmask]>
To: <[log in to unmask]>
Sent: Sunday, June 10, 2007 6:33 AM
Subject: Re: The Stetson Passage in TWL


> Diana Manister wrote:
> >
> > Nancy, I sometimes think that myths are so often cited in poetry
> > because they order the unconscious
>
> About the only widely believed myth that is sillier than The Trinity is
> The Unconscious as an entity. There are unconscious processes but when I
> come across references to "The Unconscious" I just stop reading for only
> silliness is apt to follow.
>
> Carrol
>
>
> -- 
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