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Dear Nancy,
    Since you wrote "In any case, daring moments are not very present in 
any of the poetry" it seems to me that you were expanding the 
conversation from the particular phrase in TWL. I am sorry if you feel 
you were misunderstood, but I wanted, and want, to make it clear that 
writing is itself an action that has attributes independent of the 
subjects it is concerned with.

    You continued: "are not very present in any of the poetry, and when 
they are possible, whoever is speaking tends to fail."  I don't know if 
you mean to limit your focus to those who announce I am daring, but the 
young man carbuncular, for instance, dares and doesn't fail by his own 
lights, at least.

    What passages were you thinking of, please, when you wrote "when 
they are possible, whoever is speaking tends to fail"?  I need help in 
jogging my analyses.

Best,
Marcia


Nancy Gish wrote:

> I did mean in the subject. I was responding to a comment about the
> phrase in TWL. It might have been great daring to reveal so much while
> presenting as not revealing.
> Cheers,
> Nancy
>
>>>> Marcia Karp <[log in to unmask]> 06/10/07 1:47 PM >>>
>>>
> Nancy Gish wrote:
>
>> In any case, daring
>> moments are not very present in any of the poetry, and when they are
>> possible, whoever is speaking tends to fail.
>>
>>
>>
>>
> Dear Nancy,
> You must be speaking in terms of subject or illustration. Who can
> know the dares another might take in his writing? --those moments that
> are of personal daring. In any work that stand out from the mass of
> works, it is likely that many such moments are in fact present. They
> may be grammatical or typographical; they needn't be biographical, for
> instance, to be daring to the dare-er.
>
> Marcia
>