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Carrol Cox wrote:
> 
> D A
> Datta: what have we given?
> My friend, blood shaking my heart
> The awful daring of a moment's surrender
> Which an age of prudence can never retract
> By this, and this only, we have existed
> Which is not to be found in our obituaries
> Or in memories draped by the beneficent spider
> Or under seals broken by the lean solicitor
> In our empty rooms
> 
> It is almost tempting to comment, "Doesn't he wish!" A biographical
> construal I suppose could gloss this as referring to his friend dead at
> Dardanelles.
> 
> Incidentally, why is the spider beneficent?


Seems to me that the narrator thinks that he and his friend will keep
their memories to themselves even beyond the grave and that the spider
will do good in draping even their gravestones.

And then Eliot's note causes us to read about Flamineo's rant against
the faithlessness of women.


Regards,
    Rick Parker