Error during command authentication.

Error - unable to initiate communication with LISTSERV (errno=10061, phase=CONNECT, target=127.0.0.1:2306). The server is probably not started. LISTSERV 16.0 - TSE Archives

Print

Print


I assume the source for that "information" is Emily herself.
Any sources for Eliot's side of the question?

P.
----- Original Message ----- 
From: "Nancy Gish" <[log in to unmask]>
To: <[log in to unmask]>
Sent: Friday, June 15, 2007 8:25 AM
Subject: Re: New England Ladies


> According to Gordon, "Eliot claimed that before he left for Europe in
> 1914 he told Emily Hale that he was in love with her.  He said that he
> had no reason to believe, from the way in which his declaration was
> received, that his feelings were returned 'in any degree whatever'." But
> they had a relationship:  he sent her roses via Aiken.  He kept in touch
> with her when he was in Oxford, just before he married Vivien.  And then
> he renewed it with visits, letters, autographed copies of his work, a
> shared visit to Burnt Norton that he wrote of as a moment of
> illumination.  And in 1914 a young lady was expected to be modest and
> non-expressive.  Not knowing what 1911 has to do with it is not knowing
> history.  That she sustained the correspondence and visited him was more
> than an acceptance later.  At any rate, he made the avowal of love; she
> had every reason to expect it to mean what it said.
>
> Nancy
>
>
>
>
> Yes, saying he was in love was in effect a proposal of marriage. Emily
> and Tom were both members of upper-class Boston families whose relatives
> no doubt knew each other socially and perhaps in business as well. The
> families would have been aware of the situation and so Tom's defection
> would have involved their censure. Emily had the social code of her
> class as reinforcement for her trust in Eliot. Diana
>
> Nancy wrote: "As I said, there is no analogy.  In 1911, if a man said he
> was in love,
> it was to be trusted.  That was the point of those words.  And it is
> frankly disgraceful to say that when a man betrays trust the woman is
> just silly.  It is outrageous.
> Nancy"
>
> >>> Kate Troy <[log in to unmask]> 06/14/07 8:06 PM >>>
>
> By the way, Nancy, Annette was also a New England lady.
>
> As I remember, Annette had a good job and received promotions, etc. She
>
> owned a nice home. Emily waited all of those years, instead of pursuing
> her
> happiness with a man who wanted to be with her.  I imagine that Emily
> used  to cry
> at Christmas and Thanksgiving and on her birthday, etc., just as
> Annette used
> to do.
>
> In a message dated 6/14/2007 7:40:01 P.M. Eastern Daylight Time,
> [log in to unmask] writes:
>
> Emily  Hale was a very accomplished, intelligent woman who was also a
> New
> England  lady in 1911 when she and TSE met--well before the married Viv.
>
> When they  started writing and seeing each other, Viv had been put in
> an
> institution.  Hale did not just meet a married man and "see"  him.
> There
> is no analogy at all.  She was not remotely silly or  naive.
>
> Nancy
>
>
>
>
>
> ************************************** See what's free at
> http://www.aol.com.
>
>
>
>
> --------------------------------------------------------------------------
------
> Hotmail to go? Get your Hotmail, news, sports and much more!
>
> >>> Diana Manister <[log in to unmask]> 06/15/07 10:13 AM >>>
>
>
> -- 
> No virus found in this incoming message.
> Checked by AVG Free Edition.
> Version: 7.5.472 / Virus Database: 269.8.17/850 - Release Date: 6/15/2007
11:31 AM
>
>