Eliot's notes to the poem reveal that the corpse is a reference to one dug up by a wolf in John Webster's play The White Devil. Further discussion can be found in, among other sources,

Gilbert, Sandra M.
"Rats' Alley": The Great War, Modernism, and the (Anti)Pastoral Elegy
New Literary History - Volume 30, Number 1, Winter 1999, pp. 179-201

"The Burial of the Dead: Eliot's Corpse in the Garden in a Christian Context" by Jeffrey L. Spear in JStor

http://links.jstor.org/sici?sici=0002-9831(197805)50%3A2%3C282%3A%22BOTDE%3E2.0.CO%3B2-V

Diana

.



 


From:  Tom Gray <[log in to unmask]>
Reply-To:  "T. S. Eliot Discussion forum." <[log in to unmask]>
To:  [log in to unmask]
Subject:  The Yoruba and TSE
Date:  Sat, 2 Jun 2007 07:32:24 -0700
From today's issue of the Guardian:

From a description of a talk by Wole Soyinka - Nobel
laureate

'He reserved a sideswipe for TS Eliot, for stealing a
Yoruba saying for The Waste Land. According to
Soyinka, the original line was: "That corpse that you
buried in your garden: its toes have begun to poke
through."'

Full article at:

http://books.guardian.co.uk/review/story/0,,2093138,00.html



____________________________________________________________________________________
Now that's room service!  Choose from over 150,000 hotels
in 45,000 destinations on Yahoo! Travel to find your fit.
http://farechase.yahoo.com/promo-generic-14795097


Make every IM count. Download Messenger and join the iím Initiative now. Itís free.