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A post from CR got me looking at TWL's game of chess more closely.
The chess game lines in TWL came from a draft poem called "Death of
the Duchess" which had these lines:

    * We should play a game of chess
    * The ivory men make company between us
    * We should play a game of chess
    * Pressing lidless eyes and waiting for a knock upon the door.

Eliot took these lines, tweaked them and combined them in a new way to
produce this in the TWL draft:

    * And we shall play a game of chess:
    * The ivory men make company between us
    * Pressing lidless eyes and waiting for a knock upon the door.

According to Valerie Eliot Vivienne requested that the middle line be
removed producing:
    * And we shall play a game of chess,
    * Pressing lidless eyes and waiting for a knock upon the door.

Eliot must have hated doing this.  In 1960 he added the line back in a
copy of the poem sold to benefit the London Library.  Also, since the
manuscript of TWL didn't have a note or marking to get rid of the line,
he must have mentioned the line to Valerie when he was alive.

The three line version would have become an echo at the end of the
first section of Part II of the tangled syntax at the beginning of the
section (with the chess pieces at first appearing to be the ones with
the lidless eyes).

Now, going from the poetry to the biography, I am interested in
hearing opinions why Vivien requested the line to be omitted.  She
noted "Wonderful" next to the conversational part of the section
although if read biographically it would not be flattering.  The
redacted line seems so much nicer.

The best explanation I can come up with is my invented story of the
chess set being a wedding gift that game with a note saying something
like the deleted line and Viv didn't want the giver to be offended.

Regards,
    Rick Parker