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I think you've put your finger on it in a fairly gentle if direct way,
Ken. I simply find Diana hard to take seriously, but the jousting is
entertaining to a degree. I suspect that's what she's up to, anyway.

Cheers,
Peter
----- Original Message ----- 
From: "Ken Armstrong" <[log in to unmask]>
To: <[log in to unmask]>
Sent: Sunday, April 01, 2007 1:20 PM
Subject: Re: Welcome Back Gunnar!


> Diana --
>
>   I've tried to compose a couple of replies to this and trashed them, I
> think because, even while trying to be calm and even-handed, they came out
> sounding extreme,simply based on trying to adjust their perceptibility to
> the density of what they were in response to. Like bringing acid to a
happy
> fizzies party or a wake-up call to a noisy sleepwalker.
>
>   I realize you have a little cordon of yea-sayers, but I don't think you
> or they have taken much of a look at how empty your argument is.  I mean
> the part that begins after Forster/Conrad (no aspersions here from me who
> flew the satire/irony flag in my own moment of deluded effusion) wherein
> you say obviously unexamined things like, well, every sentence from "Call
> it ironic..." on.  Let's be honest. What rubbish. Eliot's work did not
> contribute to the greatest horror of his age. He did not live in a
hermetic
> atmosphere (England). He did not think his portrayal of the Jew in Poems
> 1920 was a joke (remember he wrote his brother that they were "intensely
> serious.") You don't get a single thing right, Diana. And then you try to
> explain Eliot in terms of prejudice and its properties!! You're right
about
> what the problem is, you just don't see who it more properly clings to.
> You, too, Gunnar. Welcome back.
>
> Ken A
>
>
>
> At 08:50 AM 3/31/2007, Diana Manister wrote:
>
>
>
> >Call it ironic or what you will that Eliot, who himself suffered despair,
> >was not aware that his own creative work could contribute to the greatest
> >horror of his time. I did read somewhere that he was shocked when he was
> >presented with evidence of the Holocaust. Perhaps he felt that his
> >caricatures of Jews were harmless jokes; after all they were acceptable
in
> >his set and all too common.
> >
> >
> >I think Eliot was in a similar position. Living in a hermetic atmosphere
> >where everyone agrees with your prejudice, one can be taken aback when a
> >different group regards you as a bigot.
>
>
> -- 
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4:23 PM
>
>