Print

Print


>
>From: "Utopias" <[log in to unmask]>
>Subject: CFP: Intercultural Imaginaries of the 
>Ideal: East-West Comparative Utopias (Australia) 
>(no deadline noted; 12/7/07)
>
>Intercultural Imaginaries of the Ideal: East-West Comparative Utopias
>
>7 December 2007
>
>Monash University
>
>
>
>Utopia and utopianism are perceived to be primarily Western constructs 
>
>Western dreams of a better world, an ideal existence or a fantastic
>
>future. And it is true that the definitions, design and development of
>
>utopian literatures and theories have emerged from Western examples of
>
>the genre. Almost all cultures have foundation stories or myths
>
>expressing an avatar of the Golden Age, such as the Garden of Eden in a
>
>Judeo-Christian perspective or the Dreamtime in the Australian Aboriginal
>
>worldview or the Pure Land of Eternal Happiness in ancient Indian
>
>Buddhism, but whether or not there is concurrent or subsequent
>
>development of utopian writings and practices in these cultures is still
>
>a subject of debate. Until recently, much of the scholarship on the
>
>subject has privileged the Western model of utopia, and it has been
>
>proposed that the only country outside the West to produce a real and
>
>ongoing utopian tradition is China. However, there is substantial
>
>evidence to suggest that most cultures generate  if not utopias
>
>corresponding to the Western design - then at least some representations
>
>of an imaginary ideal place or time that do reflect similar
>
>preoccupations to those observed in Western utopian writings and
>
>practices.
>
>
>
>The aim of these special sessions on Comparative Utopias is to identify
>
>generic tendencies as well as fundamental divergences in imagining the
>
>ideal society across various cultural contexts. We invite proposals from
>
>scholars who are working in utopian studies, but would also welcome
>
>contributions from researchers in comparative mythology, cultural
>
>anthropology, area studies, philosophy, comparative religions, indigenous
>
>histories and any other relevant areas. Following on from the Comparative
>
>Utopias workshop held at the University of Melbourne in December 2005, we
>
>would like to extend the East-West focus of our investigations to include
>
>expressions of imaginary societies and projections from a wider range of
>
>cultures, such as African, Caribbean, Islamic, Indian, Russian and
>
>Indigenous cultures of Australia, New Zealand, the Pacific and the
>
>Americas. We will also continue to explore non-Western utopian
>
>projections from Japan and China, as well as looking further to Cambodia,
>
>Vietnam, Thailand and beyond for examples.
>
>
>
>Some suggestions for panels or workshops:
>
>
>
>Archetypal Utopias  including those grounded in oral histories, popular
>
>folklore, mythologies, religious texts
>
>Utopia and Science Fiction - including futuristic fiction
>
>(Re)defining utopia or the imaginary of the ideal society  for
>
>broader application to cross-cultural examples, or with a particular
>
>focus on certain cultures
>
>Comparative chronologies of the development of the model for the ideal
>
>society
>
>Philosophical Utopias
>
>Political Utopias
>
>Social Utopias
>
>
>
>It is envisaged that most papers will be of 20 minutes duration, but
>
>proposals for workshop and round table discussions are also welcome.
>
>Selected papers will be solicited for publication in a volume to be
>
>edited by Gregory Claeys, Jacqueline Dutton and Lyman Tower Sargent.
>
>Please send a 200 word abstract by email to Dr Jacqueline Dutton,
>
>University of Melbourne : [log in to unmask] <mailto:[log in to unmask]>.
>
>Your message should include your name, contact details, institutional
>
>affiliation and discipline.
>
>

*******************
The German Studies Call for Papers List
Editor: Stefani Engelstein
Assistant Editor:  Megan McKinstry
Sponsored by the University of Missouri
Info available at: http://www.missouri.edu/~graswww/resources/gerlistserv.html