Print

Print


>
>From: Mary-Catherine Harrison <[log in to unmask]>
>
>Subject: CFP: Empathy and Nation (3/25/07; MLA '07)
>
>
>CFP: Empathy and Nation  (3/25/07; MLA 2007) MLA 2007, Chicago, IL
>
>This panel will explore the relationship between empathy, reading, and
>national identity.
>
>Over the past twenty years, empathy has emerged as a central category
>in the analysis of intersubjective relationships, or relationships
>between self and other.  Empathyó-the ability to imagine oneself in
>anotherís place and so understand or ìshareî her cognitive, affective,
>and volitional statesó-is critical, research has shown, to our ability
>to understand and interact with other people.  Theorizing empathy is an
>interdisciplinary effort, with important research emerging in cognitive
>science, social, developmental, and clinical psychology, philosophy of
>mind, philosophy of social science, animal ethology, and anthropology. 
>While a small number of philosophers, psychologists, and literary
>critics have turned their attention to the mechanics and ramifications
>of empathy with art and with literary characters, the critical
>potential of this social, psychological, and aesthetic category is
>still unrealized.   Starting from Benedict Andersonís seminal account
>of nations as imagined communities and nationality as a cultural
>artifact, this panel proposes to examine how authors and texts might
>employ empathy in the service of creating or challenging ideas of
>citizenship. By connecting the well-established study of nationalism
>and literature with the emerging category of empathy, this panel hopes
>to bring together theories of reading and identity construction in
>combinations that will provoke further inquiry.
>
>We will consider the relationship between empathy and the construction
>of national identity across a range of time periods, cultural contexts,
>and/or genres.
>
>Questions papers might address include:
>
>-How do authors ìinstructî readers in practices of empathetic reading?
>-How does empathetic reading work to construct ideas of national identity?
>-How does empathy help readers understand concepts of ìselfî and
>ìotherî in a national or international context?
>-How do theories of empathy transform our understanding of the creation
>and maintenance of national literature(s)?
>
>Papers addressing any time period and/or genre are welcome.
>
>Please submit 1 page abstracts with a brief C.V. by email to
>Mary-Catherine Harrison ([log in to unmask]) by March 25th, 2007.
>
>Panelists must be or become MLA members by April 7, 2007.
>

*******************
The German Studies Call for Papers List
Editor: Stefani Engelstein
Assistant Editor:  Megan McKinstry
Sponsored by the University of Missouri
Info available at: http://www.missouri.edu/~graswww/resources/gerlistserv.html