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St. Louis Audubon Society is sponsoring a birding trip to Baldwin Lake and
the Peabody King Nature Area on Saturday Feb 17 starting at 9:00 AM.   The
leader will be Pat Lueders.

Baldwin Lake is a great area to see large flocks of Snow Geese and
definitely some Snow Geese.  The lake is a warm water body of water as it
provides the cooling water for the adjacent electricity generation plant.
Because of this you can expect to see good numbers of ducks as well.  A lot
of other bird species are usually found as well.

After leaving Baldwin Lake the group will go to the Peabody-King Coal area
where we have often had Short-eared Owls, sparrow species and frequently a
Loggerhead Shrike.


Directions:  From St. Louis take the Poplar Street Bridge across the
Mississippi and take Illinois Route 3 south.  Alternately, from West County
you might take I-270 to the Jefferson Barracks Bridge and then link up to
Route 3 after crossing the bridge.  Follow Hwy 3 south to Redbud and then
take Hwy 154 to Baldwin, IL.   In Baldwin there will be sign pointing north
to Lake Baldwin.  Take this road about 3.5 miles to the intersection with
Risdon or Risdon School Rd.  (The signs will also say 100 N and 2200 E.)  Go
left and follow Risdon to the obvious entrance gate which takes you to the
parking lot.    

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