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I agree!!!
P.
----- Original Message ----- 
From: "Rickard A Parker" <[log in to unmask]>
To: <[log in to unmask]>
Sent: Friday, February 09, 2007 2:47 AM
Subject: Re: TS Eliot: Modes of Communicating Emotion


> CR Mittal wrote:
> > 
> > Well, just to make a beginning of sorts, I would say : apart from
> > objective correlatives and subtle linguistics, Eliot does resort to a
> > direct expression of emotions-- and more often so than not. The
> > following passages would illustrate my point.  Or how do we describe
> > the affect they elicit ?
> > 
> > ...
> > 
> > Well, let me not go on. The question, again, is what stylistic devices
> > do these passages employ?  Do they not constitute a direct expression
> > of emotion?
> 
> 
> No, in most cases they do not.  But let's take one case where there is
> one:
>    O City city, I can sometimes hear 
>    Beside a public bar in Lower Thames Street, 
>    The pleasant whining of a mandoline 
>    And a clatter and a chatter from within 
>    Where fishmen lounge at noon: where the walls 
>    Of Magnus Martyr hold 
>    Inexplicable splendor of Ionian white and gold.
> 
> By modifing "whining" with "pleasant" there is a direct expression of
> emotion but the main emotion from the passage is in the relief from
> the dirtiness of London in Magnus Martyr.
> 
> To change things around somewhat
> let's edit Eliot: ( <-- nice sound to these words! )
> 
>    O City city, I can sometimes hear 
>    Beside a public bar in Lower Thames Street, 
>    The **TINKLING** of a mandoline 
>    And a clatter and a chatter from within 
>    Where fishmen lounge at noon: where the **REFUGE**
>    Of Magnus Martyr HOLDS 
>    Inexplicable splendor of Ionian white and gold.
> 
> Here we still get the same effects but now the emotion that the
> mandoline evokes is NOT directly expressed while the emotion that we
> get from the church is more directly expressed.
> 
> Eliot tried to avoid the direct expression of emotion.  Even in the
> line "By the waters of Leman I sat down and wept" there can be an
> ambiguity of what emotion is causing the weeping (grief, anguish, a
> happy moment recalled in a time of stress?)
> 
> In the passages you sent I see little direct expression of emotion.
> I know though that I'm leaving unanswered your question of "what
> stylistic devices do these passages employ?"
> 
> Regards,
>     Rick Parker
>