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Something worth considering is the role of stereotypes in these poems
and the degree to which they satirise those stereotypes, while working
in a multi-layered interconnection of culture and science. Perhaps
there is some attempt to wake people up to the stereotypes which
they use as a substitute for real perception.

P.
----- Original Message ----- 
From: "Ken Armstrong" <[log in to unmask]>
To: <[log in to unmask]>
Sent: Monday, February 26, 2007 12:13 PM
Subject: Re: A Girl Like Maria Re: Eliot and Anti-


> --On Saturday, February 24, 2007 8:08 AM -0800 cr mittal
> <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
>
> > Nobody denies a serious poet like Eliot the extent of his
> > seriousness about his belief,
>
>   No offense, CR, but if you believe this, I don't think you're paying
> attention. People on this list deny it. Your "patch of turf" statement
> denies it. Woods, Ricks, Julius and others all miss it, and defacto or
> positively deny it. All speak through their hats, so to speak. None take
> Eliot seriously enough to try to understand what the implications must be
> for someone who takes his specific metaphysical vision seriously. All use
> the same, forgive me for saying so, lame formula: he was anti-this or
> mis-that (there are a rogues' gallery of roots) but he was a great poet.
> Eliot the one-man rogues' gallery who produced awesomely powerful poetry.
>
>  What's wrong with that picture?
>
>  It is not a patch of turf that is at stake, CR, but any understanding
that
> is anything more than an acquaintance in passing with these poems.
>
>  and of course it will have the cultural
> > and historical context to it. What is hurtful is showing others in a
> > sordid light,
>
>  It is odd that you can be at the nub while missing its import: it is
> himself he shows in this light. Any reading of Poems 1920 that is worth
> having will have to do much better than this free associative first
> impression relativistic stuff that is the content of so much spilled ink
> about these poems, none of which actually "gets" them.
>
> The Sweeney poems, and including Burbank, are an Eliotic intellectual
> autobiography. Who is the main actor in an autobiography?
>
> Ken A
>
>
> -- 
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3:16 PM
>
>