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CR Mittal wrote:
> 
> Well, just to make a beginning of sorts, I would say : apart from
> objective correlatives and subtle linguistics, Eliot does resort to a
> direct expression of emotions-- and more often so than not. The
> following passages would illustrate my point.  Or how do we describe
> the affect they elicit ?
> 
> ...
> 
> Well, let me not go on. The question, again, is what stylistic devices
> do these passages employ?  Do they not constitute a direct expression
> of emotion?


No, in most cases they do not.  But let's take one case where there is
one:
   O City city, I can sometimes hear 
   Beside a public bar in Lower Thames Street, 
   The pleasant whining of a mandoline 
   And a clatter and a chatter from within 
   Where fishmen lounge at noon: where the walls 
   Of Magnus Martyr hold 
   Inexplicable splendor of Ionian white and gold.

By modifing "whining" with "pleasant" there is a direct expression of
emotion but the main emotion from the passage is in the relief from
the dirtiness of London in Magnus Martyr.

To change things around somewhat
let's edit Eliot: ( <-- nice sound to these words! )

   O City city, I can sometimes hear 
   Beside a public bar in Lower Thames Street, 
   The **TINKLING** of a mandoline 
   And a clatter and a chatter from within 
   Where fishmen lounge at noon: where the **REFUGE**
   Of Magnus Martyr HOLDS 
   Inexplicable splendor of Ionian white and gold.

Here we still get the same effects but now the emotion that the
mandoline evokes is NOT directly expressed while the emotion that we
get from the church is more directly expressed.

Eliot tried to avoid the direct expression of emotion.  Even in the
line "By the waters of Leman I sat down and wept" there can be an
ambiguity of what emotion is causing the weeping (grief, anguish, a
happy moment recalled in a time of stress?)

In the passages you sent I see little direct expression of emotion.
I know though that I'm leaving unanswered your question of "what
stylistic devices do these passages employ?"

Regards,
    Rick Parker