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Then I onder what Uncle Ralphy's "I hate quotations" tells us?
 
Cheers,
Peter
----- Original Message -----
From: [log in to unmask] href="mailto:[log in to unmask]">cr mittal
To: [log in to unmask] href="mailto:[log in to unmask]">[log in to unmask]
Sent: Wednesday, December 27, 2006 7:46 AM
Subject: Re: FW: A.Word.A.Day--agonistes

Thanks, Peter.
 
Sometimes an elucidation of a line of poetry comes unsought as
in the following quotation from Ralph Waldo Emerson:
 
"The only gift is a portion of thyself."
 
A cute exposition of "Datta: what have we given ?"
 
Cheers!
 
~ CR


Peter Montgomery <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
From: Wordsmith

These adjectives are called postpositive, but that's not because they're
positive words. Rather, the designation "positive" alludes to their
position -- they're placed (or deposited) after the word they modify,
for example, the adjective extraordinaire in "teacher extraordinaire".
We often find these adjectives in phrases, such as "attorney general"
or "court martial". Product names often have adjectives placed
postpositively, e.g. Miller Lite or iPod nano.

In many languages (Spanish, French, etc.) adjectives are placed after
the noun as a general rule. In English there are certain situations
where
we use adjectives postpositively. When modifying a pronoun, an adjective
is usually postpositive, as in "those responsible" or "all present".

This week there will be adjectives aplenty here. Let's look a few of the
adjectives that say to the noun: "After you!"


agonistes (ag-uh-NIS-teez) adjective

One who is engaged in a struggle.

[From Greek agonistes, from agon (contest). Ultimately from the
Indo-European root ag- (to drive, draw, or move), that is also
the source of agony, agent, agitate, actor, axiom, and assay.]

The term alludes to John Milton's 1671 tragedy "Samson Agonistes".
It depicts the final phase of Samson's life in which he is blinded
and a captive of the Philistines. A famous line from this work is:
"Eyeless in Gaza, at the mill with slaves."

-Anu Garg (garg wordsmith.org)

"This Matisse Agonistes -- wrestling with headaches, insomnia,
anxiety,
a lack of confidence and a coy muse -- is at the heart of 'Matisse
the Master' [by Hilary Spurling]."
Eric Gibson; Hostage to His Art; The Wall Street Journal (New York);
Sep 2, 2005.

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........................................................................
....
// The only gift is a portion of thyself. -Ralph Waldo Emerson, writer and
philosopher (1803-1882) //


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Pronunciation:
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http://wordsmith.org/words/agonistes.ram

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