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Carrol Cox wrote:
> 
> Marcia Karp wrote:
> >
> > Whose childhood?  Fraser's or Pound's?
> >
> > Marcia
> 
> Caught with my pronouns down. From Fraser's childhood.
> 

I dug up the book and (lest it pass with the days news) here is the
complete anecdote. I've often found the metaphor useful:

When I was a boy in the late 1920s and early 1930s in Aberdeen, a
Scottish city characterised by a fierce reticence about the easy
expression of human emotions, my young sister and I used to go almost
every Saturday afternoon to the movies, the old silent pictures; during
the more excessively sentimental episodes of a movie my sister would
lower her eyes and begin, in sheer embarassment, to chew the fingers of
her cotton-gloves. This is still a habit of hers when attending the
theatre. We invented a family adjective based on this habit of hers, an
adjective to be applied to any kind of hamminess, any kind of easy
relapsing into stock responses, any cinema-organ use of the _vox humana_
stop, in human emotion or art: the adjective glove-sucky. A number of
Pound's early poems are glove-sucky. . . .And there is the shockingly
embarassing, the extremely glove-sucky, "Ballad of the Godly Fere,"
about Jesus. . . .It tells one something about the solid power of human
bad taste that this was one of the most popular, of the most
anthologized, of Pound's early poems: Christ as Teddy Roosevelt. . . .

Carrol