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>Subject: CFP: Spells of "Romance" (grad) (12/15/06; 2/9/07-2/10/07)
>From: "Ashley N. Puig Herz" <[log in to unmask]>
>
>CALL FOR PAPERS
>
>Entralogos: Romance Studies Graduate Conference 2007
>Feb. 9-10, 2007
>Cornell University
>
>Enamored, Romanized, Romanced: Spells of ýRomanceţ
>
>What does romance conjure? How is it conjured? The word ýromanceţ has been
>used to describe an ever-increasing range of conditions, ideas, and
>actions throughout its discontinuous but persistent historical
>appearances. Such diversity points to language as a dynamic and reflective
>ground in which meaning develops continuously. Entralogos 2007 will be an
>occasion to consider this versatile signifier and its power to transform
>the state of reality. From the Roman Empire's multiple legacies to the
>Romanesque, Romanticism, and roman, romanzo, romance in narrative,
>ýromanceţ unfolds its affective force in a sensual, contagious gesture
>that underlies its expression of violence, sentiment, desire, coercion,
>lyricism, and rebellion. The magnitude of the events associated with it
>demands the awareness that assembling or pronouncing a word in a specific
>way entails the risk of altering the factual. "Romance" has imposed
>particular, complex experiences and notions (to mention only a few) of
>reading and writing, of the composition of the inhabited world (the Roman
>Empire's oikoumene, which introduced differences between East and West
>that today still foster senses of identity), and of truth, faith, and
>fiction; it intertwines emotion and beauty, as it does justice and
>property. Its many irreducible transfigurations resist the closure of
>linguistic lineage, time period, and creative form or genre by instead
>traversing them disruptively.
>
>We are interested in looking at romance from a perspective that cannot be
>exhausted within the margins of romance languages and literatures.
>Therefore, we welcome work from a variety of theoretical postures, time
>periods, disciplines, departments, or movements.
>
>Topics could include (but are not limited to):
>
>* iterations of the amorous in literature, psychoanalysis, music, and
>painting;
>* analysis of gender roles through romantic love and literary language;
>* emotions associated with ýromanceţ (desire, melancholy, nostalgia);
>* Romanticism in music;
>* melodrama;
>* passion, revolution, violence, and borders;
>* encounters among romance languages and between romance and non-romance
>languages;
>* the influence of the Roman, Romantic, and Romanesque spirits on ideas,
>practices, and events;
>* impositions of universality by religion and law;
>* consequences of imperialism on territorial practices, language,
>literature, art, the university, and politics;
>* convergences and divergences between Romanticism and Classicism;
>* Romantic Orientalism;
>* translation to and from romance languages;
>* the development of genre within literature in the vernacular;
>* and representations of the world through official languages and
>discourses and clandestine ones.
>
>Please submit an anonymous abstract of no more than 250 words by December
>15, 2006 to Bill Viestenz at [log in to unmask]  Abstracts must include an
>attached cover letter indicating the title, authorÝs name, affiliation,
>address, telephone number, and e-mail address. All papers and abstracts
>must be in English. Submissions are accepted from graduate students only.
>Interdisciplinary approaches encouraged. We look forward to your
>submissions.

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