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>From: "Decadence Conference" <[log in to unmask]>
>
>Subject: CFP: Decadence: Excess, Erosion, and Transgression 
>(12/1/06; VSGSA, 3/2/07-3/3/07)
>
>CALL FOR PAPERS
>
>DECADENCE: EXCESS, EROSION, AND TRANSGRESSION
>The 2007 UC Irvine Visual Studies Graduate Student Association Conference
>March 2-3, 2007
>
>SUBMISSIONS DEADLINE: DECEMBER 1, 2006
>
>"Decadent" is typically a value judgment, and a pejorative one at
>that, associated with particular artistic styles, habits of
>consumption, and historical periods. For example, when fin de si=E8cle
>members of the Symbolist and Aesthetic Movements were derided as
>"decadent," some reclaimed the term to invert the contemporary
>value system that had thus labeled them. As one source notes, writers
>of the 19th century Decadent movement began "to consider modern
>Europe's elaborate culture as a degeneracy, rather than the pinnacle
>of human achievement."
>
>Beyond reclaiming "the decadent," we would like to investigate how
>something comes to be labeled as such.  What motivates and sustains
>the construction of "decadence?"
>
>We propose that decadence is predicated upon the presence of a
>boundary (cultural, historical, aesthetic, etc.) that can be exceeded
>or eroded. Whether or not it is sanctioned, decadence is underpinned
>by a fundamental operation of transgression.
>
>How are the transgressions of decadence relevant to the political
>analyses of culture (material, visual, mass, and high), history
>(capital, class, identity, and dialectics), and aesthetics (taste and
>morals)?
>
>Submissions may explore, but are not limited to, some of the
>following topics and keywords:
>
>CULTURE
>
>What effect does decadence have on the boundaries between art, life,
>politics, etc. within (or across) the public and private spheres?
>Is the visual culture of capitalism inherently decadent?
>Should we disengage Decadence from its 19th century connotations or
>is it necessarily informed by them?
>What are the valences of decadence across Modernist cultural
>production (e.g. Adorno's critique of mass culture or Greenberg's
>critique of kitsch)?
>
>HISTORY
>
>How do cultures of (over)consumption relate to the international
>exertion of power and influence?
>How does decadence construct and police the boundaries of class
>through taste and morality?
>If decadence implies a value judgment, what is its effect upon the
>construction and interpretation of identities?
>How does "decadence" as a theoretical construct facilitate
>historical narratives of advance and decline?
>
>AESTHETICS
>
>What are the political stakes of a decadent sensuality or synaesthesia?
>What is the relationship between decadence and "decay" (figured as
>the obscure, arcane, outmoded, obsolete)?
>How does decadence construct and police the boundaries of Art through
>taste and morality? Alternatively, how does decadence police the
>boundaries of morality through Art?
>How does decadence function in contemporary art (in shows such as
>Ecstasy: In and About Altered States, in the "return" of craft, in
>the form of the wunderkammer)?
>
>  KEYWORDS
>.addiction; debauchery; indulgence; intoxication
>.aesthetics of violence; exploitation; punishment
>.boundaries; liminality; territory; transgressions
>.Carnivale; Degenerate Art
>.decline; erosion
>.Empire (Ancient Rome; La Belle =C9poque)
>.excess; surplus
>.exotic; grotesque; the Other; stigma
>.fetish; perversion
>.jouissance; pain; pleasure; playfulness; sensuality
>.the sacred; the profane; profanity
>.the sublime
>
>
>PLEASE SUBMIT 300 word abstracts along with your name, institution,
>email address, phone number, and C.V. to [log in to unmask]
>by December 1, 2006.
>
>FOR MORE INFORMATION, please email [log in to unmask]
>
>"Decadence"
>UCI Ph.D. Program in Visual Studies
>[log in to unmask]
>www.decadenceconference.com
>

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