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MObirds:

I was out in the back woods at my home, north of Union, MO, around 11:30 and 
was seeing many yellow-rumped
warblers, R.C. Kinglets, a brown creeper or two and a winter wren.  There 
were quite a
few robins in the woods feasting on the Carolina buckthorn berries.  I heard
a distress call and some thrashing and about fifteen seconds later a group
of bluejays came zooming in raising a tremendous fuss.  Another half minute
passed and then a large hawk streaked up and out of the woods.  It then
circled low overhead several times and then widened and heightened it's
circles.  I had the bird in sight for a full minute as it's circles drifted 
south over the open area near my house and yard.  It was an ADULT GOSHAWK.
 Pale gray barring below and faint barring on the long tail. I
clearly saw the eye-stripe on the first of its low circles.  I later found
that the bird had probably remained over head for such a long time because
the jays had forced it to drop its prey, a robin which I found dispatched on
the ground.

I was just checking other email that came in while I was writing this and 
read the posting from the Jeff City big sit where a goshawk was also seen! 
Has there been discussion about an invasion?  I suppose two birds do not an 
invasion make, but. . . ?
_______________
Donald R. Hays
Union, Missouri 

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