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>From: =?utf-8?Q?Nicole_Pissowotzki?= <[log in to unmask]>
>
>Call for Papers:
>NORTH AND NORDICITY: Representations of the North
>
>Guest speakers: Professor Sherrill Grace, Henry Beissel
>
>This interdisciplinary conference, to be held at the Munk Centre,
>University of Toronto, May 17-19, 2007, seeks to examine and explore the
>various issues surrounding image construction, identity making and
>representations of the North in literature (e.g. travelogues and other
>historical or geographical documents, philosophical writings, literary
>travel writings, popular fiction), as well as in the visual and performing
>arts.  The aim is to reveal the multiple aspects of the idea of the North
>as a discursive system created and shaped by cultures outside the North
>and from within.
>
>For centuries the North has constituted a mythological space, constantly
>defined, and redefined, by centuries of writers and explorers.  Its
>literary beginnings are found in ancient Greek writings, followed by
>Biblical texts and Nordic sagas.  European cultures, especially French and
>German, subsequently undertook the task of defining the North.  More
>recently, this task was picked up by northern cultures, namely
>Scandinavia, Finland, as well as English and French Canada.  Today, the
>North has been brought into question by Aboriginal cultures.  These
>literary representations of the North go beyond mere descriptions of a
>geographic space, constituting a fascinating, multi-layered and multi-
>cultural discourse strengthened by centuries of civilizations.  Whether
>depicted as a land of vast resources ripe for conquest, an elusive space
>whose boundaries continually retreat to the horizon defying conquest, or
>included in the discourse of political self-affirmation and the fantastic,
>the understanding of the North, or lack thereof, has shifted over time and
>is based in a rich, universal discourse fashioned by centuries of
>representations.
>
>Proposals for papers from various disciplines are invited.  As indicated
>above, possible topics may include but are not limited to the following:
>
>Regional identity and 'Northerness'; images of single countries or
>specific regions in the North (e.g. German representations of the American
>North); the realist North; Northern myths; the medieval North; the
>spiritual North; the 'oriental' North; philosophy of the North and
>Northern philosophies; the romantic North; the Queer North; the gendered
>North; the uncanny North; the North in music; Northern images in
>photography and film; material culture/exploitation and the North;
>Northern stereotypes; staging/performing the North; psychoanalytical
>readings of the North; the North writes back.
>
>Send abstracts (no more than 250 words) for proposed 20 minute papers in
>English by 25 October 2006 to [log in to unmask]  If an abstract
>is accepted for the conference, a full draft paper should be submitted by
>March 17.  Accepted papers are intended to be published.
>

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The German Studies Call for Papers List
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