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>
>From:         Michael Perraudin <[log in to unmask]>
>Subject: CFP: The European Folk Revival, 1760-1914
>
>CALL FOR PAPERS:
>Centre for Nineteenth-Century Studies
>University of Sheffield
>in association with the Departments of History, Germanic Studies and English
>Literature and the National Centre for English Cultural Tradition
>International Interdisciplinary Conference
>Friday 7 - Sunday 9 September 2007
>
>"The Voice of the People:
>The European Folk Revival,
>1760-1914"
>
>Convenors: Timothy Baycroft, Joan Beal, Matthew Campbell, Hamish Mathison,
>Michael Perraudin, Marcus Waithe 
>The rediscovery and revalidation of the &#145;culture of the 
>people&amp;#146; was a
>defining feature of artistic and intellectual life in the societies of
>nineteenth- and late eighteenth-century Europe, and it underpinned many of
>the key ideological tendencies of the times. Romantics and pre-Romantics
>articulated their sense of the inadequacy of cosmopolitan rationalism by
>espousing the cultural productions of ordinary (uneducated, rural) people as
>repositories of pre-rational truth and authentic experience. The nostalgic
>imitation, collection and study of folksong, folktale, folk custom and folk
>belief which this engendered became a process of linguistic, historical and
>mythical identity-formation with powerful political consequences; and the
>new nationalism which increasingly destabilised the European political order
>over the course of the nineteenth century gained its legitimacy from such
>activity. At the same time, radical movements from the late eighteenth
>century onwards found sustenance in evidence of the cultural autonomy and
>superiority of ordinary people, in customs and festivals, songs and
>story-telling. Nineteenth-century socialism did not seek to root itself in
>resuscitated systems of myth, but its mythologisation of the proletariat had
>a related intellectual impetus. The European nineteenth century, it can be
>said, was the age of the people and peoples, of masses and nations; and the
>cultural expression of this identity was the folk revival.
>The proposed conference aims to encompass the span of the European folk
>revival from its beginnings in the middle of the eighteenth century to its
>cataclysm, the war of the peoples, World War One. The revival&#146;s British
>emergence from 1760 in works such as Macpherson&#146;s Ossian or 
>Percy&#146;s Reliques
>will be traced. Its reception and philosophical development in Germany by
>J.G. Herder and its further elaboration by British, German and French
>Romanticism (Wordsworth and Coleridge, Renan and Arnold, Novalis and the
>Schlegels, Arnim, Brentano and the Grimms) will be examined. The
>folkloristic or popular-cultural dimensions both of nineteenth-century
>socialist utopias - Saint-Simon, Marx, William Morris - and of the diverse
>national movements of nineteenth century Europe, from Ireland to Italy,
>Belgium to Bulgaria and beyond, will be observed. Offerings from all
>relevant branches of political, social, cultural, linguistic and literary
>history are encouraged. Analyses of modern re- revivals would also be of
>interest. The main language of the conference will be English, but papers
>can also be delivered and discussed in German and French.
>
>Possible topics for papers include:
>
>Macpherson, Percy, Herder and their descendants
>Nationalism, regionalism, cosmopolitanism
>Celt and Teuton, Latin and Slav
>Socialism and folk nostalgia
>Democracy and demagoguery
>Gender, nation and folk
>Translation, renovation and forgery
>The language of the folk
>Mythologies old and new
>Folktale and fairy-tale
>Epic poetry and folk lyric
>Hybridity, authenticity and synthetic form
>Ballad, performance and print
>Folklore and education
>Fine art, folk art
>Music and folk-song
>Historians, poets, collectors, editors, theorists
>of the Folk Revival
>
>Papers will be 30 minutes long. To apply to deliver a paper at the
>conference, please send by email an abstract of a few lines plus a brief
>c.v.  to one of the convenors (t.baycroft@ j.c.beal@ m.campbell@ h.mathison@
>m.perraudin@ m.j.waithe@ sheffield.ac.uk) AND simultaneously to the
>conference email account ([log in to unmask]).
>Deadline for submission: December 1st 2006
>Preliminary expressions of interest would be welcome
>Conference web address: www.c19.group.shef.ac.uk/folkrevival.html
>CALL FOR PAPERS:
>Centre for Nineteenth-Century Studies
>University of Sheffield
>in association with the Departments of History, Germanic Studies and English
>Literature and the National Centre for English Cultural Tradition
>International Interdisciplinary Conference
>Friday 7 - Sunday 9 September 2007
>
>"The Voice of the People:
>The European Folk Revival,
>1760-1914"
>
>Convenors: Timothy Baycroft, Joan Beal, Matthew Campbell, Hamish Mathison,
>Michael Perraudin, Marcus Waithe 
>The rediscovery and revalidation of the &#145;culture of the 
>people&amp;#146; was a
>defining feature of artistic and intellectual life in the societies of
>nineteenth- and late eighteenth-century Europe, and it underpinned many of
>the key ideological tendencies of the times. Romantics and pre-Romantics
>articulated their sense of the inadequacy of cosmopolitan rationalism by
>espousing the cultural productions of ordinary (uneducated, rural) people as
>repositories of pre-rational truth and authentic experience. The nostalgic
>imitation, collection and study of folksong, folktale, folk custom and folk
>belief which this engendered became a process of linguistic, historical and
>mythical identity-formation with powerful political consequences; and the
>new nationalism which increasingly destabilised the European political order
>over the course of the nineteenth century gained its legitimacy from such
>activity. At the same time, radical movements from the late eighteenth
>century onwards found sustenance in evidence of the cultural autonomy and
>superiority of ordinary people, in customs and festivals, songs and
>story-telling. Nineteenth-century socialism did not seek to root itself in
>resuscitated systems of myth, but its mythologisation of the proletariat had
>a related intellectual impetus. The European nineteenth century, it can be
>said, was the age of the people and peoples, of masses and nations; and the
>cultural expression of this identity was the folk revival.
>The proposed conference aims to encompass the span of the European folk
>revival from its beginnings in the middle of the eighteenth century to its
>cataclysm, the war of the peoples, World War One. The revival&#146;s British
>emergence from 1760 in works such as Macpherson&#146;s Ossian or 
>Percy&#146;s Reliques
>will be traced. Its reception and philosophical development in Germany by
>J.G. Herder and its further elaboration by British, German and French
>Romanticism (Wordsworth and Coleridge, Renan and Arnold, Novalis and the
>Schlegels, Arnim, Brentano and the Grimms) will be examined. The
>folkloristic or popular-cultural dimensions both of nineteenth-century
>socialist utopias - Saint-Simon, Marx, William Morris - and of the diverse
>national movements of nineteenth century Europe, from Ireland to Italy,
>Belgium to Bulgaria and beyond, will be observed. Offerings from all
>relevant branches of political, social, cultural, linguistic and literary
>history are encouraged. Analyses of modern re- revivals would also be of
>interest. The main language of the conference will be English, but papers
>can also be delivered and discussed in German and French.
>
>Possible topics for papers include:
>
>Macpherson, Percy, Herder and their descendants
>Nationalism, regionalism, cosmopolitanism
>Celt and Teuton, Latin and Slav
>Socialism and folk nostalgia
>Democracy and demagoguery
>Gender, nation and folk
>Translation, renovation and forgery
>The language of the folk
>Mythologies old and new
>Folktale and fairy-tale
>Epic poetry and folk lyric
>Hybridity, authenticity and synthetic form
>Ballad, performance and print
>Folklore and education
>Fine art, folk art
>Music and folk-song
>Historians, poets, collectors, editors, theorists
>of the Folk Revival
>
>Papers will be 30 minutes long. To apply to deliver a paper at the
>conference, please send by email an abstract of a few lines plus a brief
>c.v.  to one of the convenors (t.baycroft@ j.c.beal@ m.campbell@ h.mathison@
>m.perraudin@ m.j.waithe@ sheffield.ac.uk) AND simultaneously to the
>conference email account ([log in to unmask]).
>Deadline for submission: December 1st 2006
>Preliminary expressions of interest would be welcome
>Conference web address: www.c19.group.shef.ac.uk/folkrevival.html
>
>Prof Michael Perraudin
>Department of Germanic Studies
>University of Sheffield, Sheffield S10 2TN, GB

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