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I note that Tommie Rogers had a N. Goshawk at Squaw Creek the other day. I 
have not yet seen one reported on the Iowa list, but it is early.

Does anyone know if this is an "echo flight" N. Goshawk year?

As I understand it, N. Goshawks erupt and go south approximately on a 10 or 
11-year cyle, which is tied to a build-up and crash of  a Ruffed Grouse 
and/or Snowshoe Hare population. There is often a smaller flight, called an 
"echo flight" on the next year.

We recently had a N. Goshawk year, but I forget whether it was last year or 
the year before. If the flight occurred last year, this year may be the echo 
flight year.  Tommie's bird may be the vanguard of the echo flight, and we 
should look for more.

N. Goshawks occaisionally show up in Missouri in non-flight years, but they 
are pretty uncommon. I also wonder how many make it back in flight years. 
Perhaps  some of them just stay until they die, and Tommie's bird may be one 
of those.

(I Googled "N. Goshawk eruption" and came up with one 1999 post which said 
there were eruptions noted at Hawk Ridge in Duluth in 1972, 1982 and 1992. 
Even if the next one were delayed a year or two, we should have had it by 
now.)

Bob Fisher
Independence, Missouri
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