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Then you might be interested in Stavros' three brothers,
Demetrios, Petros, and Jason, all of whom are out of work.

P.
  ----- Original Message ----- 
  From: Diana Manister 
  To: [log in to unmask] 
  Sent: Friday, September 29, 2006 8:40 AM
  Subject: Re: Some questions re The Cocktail Party


  Peter wrote: 

  I'm reminded of Stavros who went in with a torn
  pair of pants, to his Greek tailor.

  The tailor said: Euripedes?
  Stavros replied: Eumenides?

  That's a keeper! LOL. Diana





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    From:  Peter Montgomery <[log in to unmask]>
    Reply-To:  "T. S. Eliot Discussion forum." <[log in to unmask]>
    To:  [log in to unmask]
    Subject:  Re: Some questions re The Cocktail Party
    Date:  Thu, 28 Sep 2006 22:44:01 -0700
    I recognised the image the first time I read it.
    In highschool I had heard or read of such treatment
    in one tribal culture or another, so I didn't think to
    question it. I beleieve that culture was either
    African or South East Asian, but I'm not sure.
    It is, in effect, something of a modern equivalent
    to crucifixion. It is, I think, meant to be as big a
    camel as one can think of. The trick is to
    stop the eye of the needle.

    It certainly didn't stop the play from being a winner
    on Broadway and Shaftesbury Ave. at the same time.

    Have you checked any of the commentaries?
    Williamson is usually good for details like that.

    I scanned the Jones section on TCP for you,
    but no joy.

    Have you thought of considering the Greek prototype
    Eliot used, ALCESTIS, and the character of that name
    in the Euripedes' play?

    I'm reminded of Stavros who went in with a torn
    pair of pants, to hisGreek tailor.

    The tailor said: Euripedes?
    Stavros replied: Eumenides?

    So much for trying to get over the hump.

    P.
    ----- Original Message -----
    From: "Carrol Cox" <[log in to unmask]>
    To: <[log in to unmask]>
    Sent: Tuesday, September 26, 2006 6:30 PM
    Subject: Some questions re The Cocktail Party


    > What are the political presuppositions of the crucifixion of Celia on an
    > ant hill in the Cocktail Party? Where on earth, hypothetically, would
    > such scene be located in 1950? What business would an English woman have
    > inserting herself in such a location? Since the fact is only thrown in
    > almost parenthetically at the end, with no context or rationale given,
    > the play assumes that it will be perfectly intelligible to the audience.
    > What is one to say of an audience that can swallow that camel? What can
    > one say of the social/political premises of a playwright who can ask his
    > audience to swallow that camel? Are Eliot's assumptions the same as or
    > at least related to those of Kipling in "The White Man's Burden"?
    >
    > Carrol
    >
    >
    > --
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    >
    >



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