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Diana,
    You've changed your claim from "The writer's task is to know how to 
jibe his/her experience with that of others" to "knows how to reach 
people .. speaks/writes about universal human themes."  They are not 
equivalent.

    I don't buy, by the way, that an audience must "relate their own 
experience to the work," or that such relating is equivalent to 
universal theme-ness.

Marcia

Diana Manister wrote:

> Marcia, any good communicator, speaker or writer, knows how to reach 
> people. That is a truism. Either one does market research with focus 
> groups to find out what interests people, or onespeaks/writes about 
> universal human themes.
>
> An audience for a Sophocles drama did not have to be Sophocles to 
> relate their own experience to the work. How a genius intuits 
> universal themes is another subject.
>
> Diana
>
>
>
>  
>
>     ------------------------------------------------------------------------
>     From: Marcia Karp <[log in to unmask]>
>     Reply-To: "T. S. Eliot Discussion forum." <[log in to unmask]>
>     To: [log in to unmask]
>     Subject: Re: Eliot and Biography
>     Date: Sun, 3 Sep 2006 10:51:36 -0400
>
>     No it isn't.  It's to use language to tell some truth, and as you
>     say, to create meaning in the poem.  Creation of which is not at
>     all the same as jibing experience with that of others.  Must a
>     writer know how every other experiences the world?  Is this possible?
>
>     Marcia
>
>     Diana Manister wrote:
>
>
>         David, are you not simply saying that reading is always
>         colored by the reader's experience? The writer's task is to
>         know how to jibe his/her experience with that of others, not
>         entirely, but to such a degree that meaning is created.
>         Literature is not unlike speech in that respect.
>
>