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It's just that judging someone's feelings, or even their responses, from 
behavior is not always possible.  No matter the distances between them, 
I am not surprised to hear he cried.  Hard as it is to get through many 
of his poems without without tears, including Preludes, his humanity is 
apparent to me.  Yes, people are odd,

    But when was that ever a bar
    To any watch they keep? [R Frost]

Perhaps my own inconsistencies are more apparent to me than yours to you,
Best,
Marcia

Diana Manister wrote:

> Well the entire relationship was odd, wasn't it? It was not just 
> Vivien who was a bit off, but both of them. (He wore green face powder 
> sometimes. Not your average bear.) Some commentators say his distance 
> and coldness exacerbated her problems, but it's a chicken-and-egg 
> question I suppose. Diana
>
> From:  Marcia Karp <[log in to unmask]>
> Reply-To:  "T. S. Eliot Discussion forum." <[log in to unmask]>
> To:  [log in to unmask]
> Subject:  Re: Item from The Guardian
> Date:  Wed, 13 Sep 2006 17:31:49 -0400
> His tears hardly seem odd to me, but I suppose that's one reason we 
> need poetry--to enlarge our understanding of other people.
>
> Marcia
>
> Diana Manister wrote:
>
> >I recall reading in some biography that Eliot broke down in tears
> >when he was informed of Vivienne's death, which struck me as odd
> >since he never visited her during her hospitalization and avoided
> >her before that. If he knew she killed herself, it might explain his
> >reaction. Diana
> >
> >
>