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Ken, with respect to your question about the dissolution of the self-object duality in wave-particle perception, I can only say that self/other self would perpetuate the duality. The very phenomenon of wave includes the observer, as does the phenomenon of particle, since which phenomenon is perceived is dependent on the observation itself. The old Cartesian model does not obtain. The other cannot be separated from the self in this scenario.

You wrote: "I thought time in Einstein's theory was relative, not subjective."

Einstein's relativity describes time as relative to the observer's speed. At very rapid speeds, time slows down. A twin returning to earth after time spent in high speed space travel would have aged differently from his sibling. Time is subjective in that sense. There is no absolute time in Einstein's theory.

Further:

I wrote:  At the speed of light, there is no time -- consciousness
>travelling at that rate would be timeless. In a timeless state,
>considerations of cause and effect do not obtain, since chronology
>is a function of time.  Diana

You wrote: Sounds like a faux eternity.

"Eternity" is figure of speech. Forever is pure speculation. Just as physics knows little or nothing about the universe's origin, its end is also unknown.

Cheers, Diana (BTW I'm not a physicist either, just a poet who watches "Nova" and reads a lot!)




 

From:  Ken Armstrong <[log in to unmask]>
Diana Manister wrote:

>The particle-wave example illuminates quantum physics' new
>phenomenology: the observed cannot be separated from the observer.
>Subjectivity in this case determines the object. The self/other
>split is Cartesian.

   Why doesn't the verb determine the subject? By "self/other" do you mean self/ other self?



>In Einsteinian physics, the phenomenon of time is subjective.

   I'm not a physicist or anything close. I thought time in Einstein's theory was relative, not subjective.


>  At the speed of light, there is no time -- consciousness
>travelling at that rate would be timeless. In a timeless state,
>considerations of cause and effect do not obtain, since chronology
>is a function of time.  Diana

   Sounds like a faux eternity.

Ken A.