Dunja, Nancy makes the same point that James Joyce did when he said that after a work of literature is finished and sent out into the world, the author sits back and pares his fingernails. Presumably because it is on its own, like a child or a stone. Diana

Luckily, a poem is not a stone.
Or, we can even put it this way: luckily, a stone can
be a sign.

Dunja

--- Nancy Gish <[log in to unmask]> wrote:

> This is a particularly interesting perspective since
> a stone is a stone,
> and in the words of Hugh MacDiarmid, "We must
> reconcile ourselves to the
> stones, / Not the stones to us.
>
> Just as the poem cannot be reduced to intention or
> simple mimesis, it
> cannot be reduced to craft.   The stone is
> impenetrable, only knowable
> in many facets but not simply the ones we see
> individually and equally
> not a single core we must find.  But the
> stonecutter's whole life may
> affect how she shapes it.
>
> "On a Raised Beach" is a magnificent long poem of
> stones as language.
> Cheers,
> Nancy
>
> >>> David   Boyd <[log in to unmask]> 09/02/06 5:38
> AM >>>
>
> In a message dated 01/09/2006 22:42:17 GMT Daylight
> Time,
> [log in to unmask] writes:
>
>
> Peter wrote:
>
> The poem as a perceptual device of one's own  world,
> and one's
> own experience is much more  relevant.
>
> I take it you buy into the French view that  the
> text exists apart from
> the
> human being that created it. Perhaps that old
> scenario of monkeys
> typing texts
> can be updated to computers creating texts
> unrelated to human
> experience,
> leaving readers in solipsistic bliss.  Diana
>
>
>
>
> A lot of forays into and around and around the
> aesthetic theory maze are
>
> being made just now !
>
> - isn't it usually a case of layers of perception
> and multiple
> perspectives
> / meanings ? - eg.,  about which particular facets
> of the
> author/maker's
> skilfully-cut gem happened to sparkle for you as the
> perceiver at  that
> particular
> moment and in your particular state of [emotional
> *and* factual]  mind.
> Or,
> thinking of a wellknown biblical image, isn't our
> perception as
> 'knowing'
> adults of such things often of the 'but through a
> glass, darkly'  kind ?
>
> Similarly, this kind of extraneous 'knowledge' may
> reveal some  more
> facets but often
> at the expense many of other [ often much brighter]
> ones but doesn't it
> always
> inevitably and irrevocably alter that  experience ?
> But, however we define them, suppose  we're still
> discussing and
> looking-at
> cut gemstones as opposed  to crude and ugly lumps of
> coal or rock or
> stone.....
>
>
> David
>
>
>
>


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