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>
>From: "Natalie Phillips" <[log in to unmask]>
>Subject: CFP: Distraction and Attention in the 
>18th-C. (9/15/06; ASECS, 3/22/07-3/25/07)
>
>Distraction and Attention in Eighteenth Century
>
>How did the eighteenth century not only represent, but also handle problems
>of readerly attention and distraction?  According to Lord Chesterfield,
>์there is not in all the world a surer sign of a small and paltry mind than
>inattention.๎  Hume described the mental stretch needed to retain skeptical
>doubt as requiring endless self-discipline.  At even the slightest
>interruption, he wrote, ์the Mind, like a spring, would relax.๎ This panel
>seeks to contextualize such representations of by bringing together
>scholars of literature, art, and music who are interested in the history of
>attention.  Those interested in applied neuro-psychology, philosophy of
>mind, and histories and theories of reading are also especially welcome.
>Questions might include: what problems does the potential distractability
>of the eighteenth century reader and thinker pose to writers and
>philosophers of the age? how is the mind imagined to be contained,
>restrained, and harnessed to a subject?  what formal techniques do various
>genres use to hold their reader's interest?
>
>The deadline for proposals for this ASECS panel is September 15th, 2006.
>Please email short abstracts to Natalie Phillips at [log in to unmask] or
>mail them to Natalie Phillips, Margaret Jacks Hall, Stanford University,
>Bldg. 460 Serra St., Stanford, CA 94305.

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