Print

Print


>
>From: "KAREN M. ENG" <[log in to unmask]>
>Subject: CFP (Grad): "Between Future and Fatality"
>  (8/1/06; 10/ 27-28/06)
>
>"Between Future and Fatality:
>Utopian and Dystopian Ideas in German Literature, Film, and Culture."
>
>The German Graduate Student Governance 
>Association of the University of Cincinnati and 
>the editors of the graduate student journal 
>Focus on German Studies
>present the Eleventh Annual Focus Graduate Student Conference
>held on October 27-28, 2006 at the University of Cincinnati
>
>Keynote speaker: THOMAS MEINECKE
>
>Modern societies are based on the premise that the tomorrow is
>predictable. Humanity has excelled in 
>constructing high-tech computers, in changing 
>genetic information, in mastering diseases and 
>going into space. However, the prediction of the 
>future, the old fantasy of overcoming the 
>barrier of time is still a thorn in the flesh of 
>the homo technicus. Human beings yearn to know 
>how the world will be tomorrow and
>also how the course of the world could be changed.
>
>Literature and film have always served as media 
>for drawing up an imaginary future. Be it as a 
>harbinger of dark apocalyptic visions or the 
>beacon of a paradisiacal and ideal world. This 
>conference seeks to explore any kind of utopian 
>and/or dystopian thinking in German culture.
>We invite not only traditional scholarly works 
>in the field of German Studies but also 
>interdisciplinary responses focusing on 
>literature, film, theory, philosophy, ethics, 
>history linked to Germany.
>
>What kinds of representations of dystopian / 
>utopian ideas exist? What genre is chosen and 
>why?  What techniques do the authors choose to 
>portray these representations? In what way can 
>these works be linked to the period in which 
>they originated? To what extent did the authors'
>prophetic power influence and change the society 
>they lived in? Or are such works often escapist 
>rather than ambitiously intent on change? Are 
>these works rebellious towards their time or do 
>they rather affirm it? Is there a specific 
>German tone in such works that sets them apart 
>from
>other utopian / dystopian traditions (e.g. as opposed to the vast amount
>of such works in English). To what extent do such works exert political
>power and therefore possibly transcend their status as mere cultural
>products? Are these dystopian utopian visions reflections of real
>historical conditions projected onto the level of fantasy or fantasy
>made similar enough to reality to create narrative interest?
>We invite graduate students from all disciplines to submit paper
>proposals responding to these or similar questions related to the
>depiction of utopian and dystopian concepts in modern or pre-modern time
>periods. Possible topics include, but are by no means limited to:
>
>*       "Traditional" utopian and dystopian texts
>*       Philosophical texts attempting to construct a future world
>*       Texts and films attempting to reconstruct imaginary historic
>settings (e.g. Chr. Wolf's Kein Ort. Nirgends etcŠ)
>*       War literature, Cold War literature
>*       Science fiction literature and films
>*       Fairy tales
>*       Apocalyptic literature
>*       Social utopias in art and architecture
>*       Holocaust literature / Blut-und-Boden literature
>*       Romantic literature (“Golden Age" vs. "Nachtseitiges")
>*       Weimarer Klassik (the construction of a harmonious society)
>*       Utopian courtly societies in medieval literature
>*       Allegorical thinking in the literature of the Baroque
>*       Films referring to utopian / dystopian ideas
>*       Escapist literature
>*       Political literature
>*       GDR literature
>*       Exile literature        
>
>Revised conference papers can also be submitted 
>for publication in our Focus on German Studies 
>journal.
>
>Please send
>an abstract of 250-300 words in either English or German as Word
>attachment by August 31, 2006 to Wolfgang Lückel and Todd Heidt at
>[log in to unmask] (ATTN: Focus on GS Conference). On a separate
>cover sheet please list the proposed paper title, author's name,
>affiliation, and e-mail address. Conference participants have the option
>of housing with UC graduate students.
>University of Cincinnati, German Studies Department
>733 Old Chemistry Building, Cincinnati, OH 45221-0372
>Phone: 513-556-2752, Fax: 513-556-1991

*******************
The German Studies Call for Papers List
Editor: Stefani Engelstein
Assistant Editor:  Megan McKinstry
Sponsored by the University of Missouri
Info available at: http://www.missouri.edu/~graswww/resources/gerlistserv.html