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It's all very interesting. So many things we do not know, but would like to. It would have to be many things involved I would think.. Thanks, Edge. 
  ----- Original Message ----- 
  From: Edge<mailto:[log in to unmask]> 
  To: Joyce Rosson<mailto:[log in to unmask]> 
  Cc: [log in to unmask]<mailto:[log in to unmask]> 
  Sent: Saturday, July 22, 2006 2:15 PM
  Subject: Re: Movement of birds and animals


  There is another aspect of the movements Joyce discusses:  humans  
  have created the habitat requirements that allow some species to  
  invade/expand into areas where previously they found little or no  
  suitable habitat--lack of food, nesting/roosting sites, etc.

  Examples include planting trees on the tall grass prairies and  
  steppe.  Many eastern species now have options where the previous sea  
  of grass offered none to them.  Chimney Swifts would be among this  
  group, even without those manmade chimneys.

  Another aspect to consider is that the expansion of Chimney Swifts  
  may not be because we have reduced habitat in recent years in the  
  East, but may be, at least in part, because our structures allowed/ 
  promoted a population growth that has resulted in individuals  
  spreading out and exploring new areas that are now suitable.

  So, although we do indeed take territories, we also create conditions  
  favored by species (Canada Goose, American Robin, for example).

  Another factor is our role in introducing competitive species.  House  
  Sparrows, then House Finches compete with native species--yes, House  
  Finches are native, but in the West--we brought them into the East.   
  It would be interesting to know if European Starlings compete with  
  swifts for nesting/roosting sites as they do with woodpeckers.

  Edge Wade
  Columbia, MO
  [log in to unmask]<mailto:[log in to unmask]>

  On Jul 21, 2006, at 5:23 PM, Joyce Rosson wrote:

  > Did anyone consider that maybe with all the building we do and many  
  > people did move south, that the birds and animals simply do not  
  > have places to raise their families?
  > So they move north since they are already south, looking for more  
  > room.
  > Remember, the Chimney Swifts were only found east of the  
  > Mississippi when the first settlers came. Then we removed hollow  
  > trees that they made nests in, but built cabins with chimneys as we  
  > went West, so the Swifts moved too. Now they are still moving West,  
  > because we cap chimneys and have metal in them. They were east of  
  > the Rockies. Now we have reports of them in Denver and Montana.
  > We keep taking the animals territory and they all keep trying to  
  > find new places.
  >
  > Joyce Rosson
  > Holt, Mo.
  >
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