Print

Print


Just a reminder......after having to get multiple feeders out to alleviate
some of the hummingbird wars.......
This is the time to look for OTHER SPECIES than Ruby-throated hummingbirds
at your feeders.
Though the link below applies to Indiana, Mr. Gorney relays the info well
and the "basic info" is the same.
Also contains a link to a "cheat sheet" to ID hummingbirds (originally on KS
listserve, where they get a nice variety of hummers during this time of 
year)
http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/INDB.html#1153873490

IN MO.........
- Rufous hummingbirds too are the most likely to show up.
- Male Rufous h'birds are a slam dunk as far as IDing and do not need to be
banded for IDing or documented, though this info should be given to the 
designated
Seasonal Editor (Andy Forbes until July 31, Bill Eddleman from Aug 1 to end
of Nov.) IF allowed by the homeowner, PLEASE post this on Mobirds too so
other birders can see the bird as well.
- Any FEMALE or IMMATURE type Selasphorous species should be IDed by one of
the Hummingbird banders in the state (Lanny Chambers for the east side of
MO - [log in to unmask]  ; Think Troy Gordan is still doing the west
side of the state...yes/no? - no contact info for him)
- Actually to simplify it, any hummer other than a Ruby-throated hummingbird
probably should at least be looked at by an experienced birder (try your 
local
Audubon birder or ASM member) OR at least contact Kristi Mayo, who does
the Rare Bird Alert for MO: [log in to unmask]

Species seen in MO (that I find on the MO Checklist)
Ruby-throated, Rufous, Anna's, Black-chinned, Green Violet-ear, Calliope.
SO, be on the lookout.

Excellent book with great pictures for h'bird ID is Sheri L. Williamson's 
book "Hummingbirds of North America". Can be purchased at most book stores 
and internet sources, even think Busch CA, St. Charles co is selling them 
(so look at your regional MDC/DNR headquarters)

In this heat (and in general) make sure to keep them clean:
http://www.hummingbirds.net/feeders.html#cleaning
Don't want a picture of a rare hummingbird on your dirty feeder circulate on 
the internet.  ;-)

Also keep at least one feeder up until Halloween or LONGER if the temps 
allow or you wish to maintain it with a heating lamp.
I personally have seen Rufous hummingbirds at peoples' feeders in Nov, Dec 
AND Jan in the St. Louis area.
I have also seen an Anna's in December (this bird was at this person's 
feeder since mid- October).

Have fun watching the hummingbird wars in your backyard.

Good birding,
Charlene Malone
St. Louis co.

__________________________________________________
###########################################################
*              Audubon Society of Missouri's              *
*                Wild Bird Discussion Forum               *
*---------------------------------------------------------*
* To subscribe or unsubscribe, click here:                *
* https://po.missouri.edu/cgi-bin/wa?SUBED1=mobirds-l&A=1 *
*---------------------------------------------------------*
* To access the list archives, click here:                *
* http://po.missouri.edu/archives/mobirds-l.html          *
*                                                         *
* To access the Audubon Society of Missouri Web           *
* Site:  http://mobirds.org                               *
###########################################################