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>
>Subject: CFP: The Jewish Graphic Novel (11/30/06; collection)
>
>From: "Omer-Sherman, Ranen" <[log in to unmask]>
>
>The Jewish Graphic Novel
>
>Essays sought for an interdisciplinary collection co-edited by an art
>historian and literary scholar. The growing subgenre of Jewish literary
>and graphic culture contains a number of significantly innovative
>aesthetic works that are increasingly recognized by literary critics as
>an exciting form of alternative narrative that may also represent the
>inception of a new visual literacy that has significant implications for
>the future of Jewish literary and artistic expression. As the catalogue
>of a recent art exhibit devoted to this cultural phenomenon states,
>"Jewish Graphic novels represent an important genre in artistic
>expression and assert the intensity of word and image in conveying
>narratives that speak eloquently to the contemporary viewer. [They]
>offer intense visual elucidation of Jewish historic and literary events
>by combining intense illustration with searing social issues." Works to
>be addressed may include graphic novels by Will Eisner (A Contract With
>God: and Other Tenement Stories, Fagin the Jew, The Plot: The Secret
>Story of the Protocols of the Elders of Zion) Czech writer Vittorio
>Giardino's trilogy of volumes about Jewish life under the shadow of
>totalitarianism: A Jew in Communist Prague: Loss of Innocence, A Jew in
>Communist Prague: Adolescence, and A Jew in Communist Prague: Rebellion;
>Ben Katchor's The Jew of New York; Miriam Katin's memoir of WWII
>survival, We Are On Our Own; Neil Kleid's portrayal of mobsters in
>Brownsville; Etgar Keret's surreal tales, Jetlag: Five Graphic Novellas;
>Joe Kubert's stunning account of the Warsaw ghetto uprising in Yossel:
>April 14, 1943; Joann Sfar's whimsically philosophical The Rabbi's Cat,
>James Strum's disturbing parable of American racism, The Golem's Mighty
>Swing; and J.T. Waldman's recent bold retelling of the essential Jewish
>myth of power and powerlessness in Megillat Esther. The editors also
>hope to include an essay or two on the impact of Art Spiegelman's
>seminal works of Holocaust oral history in Maus: A Survivor's Tale: My
>Father Bleeds History and Maus II: A Survivor's Tale: And Here My
>Troubles Began, which crystallized the acceptance of the graphic novel
>as a legitimate literary form. This collection aspires to fill an
>important gap in existing scholarship by offering the first collection
>of critical discussions to solely address the way that Jewish graphic
>novels grapple with Jewish history, cultural politics, antisemitism,
>portrayals of Ashkenazi and Sephardic identities, the role of the
>Holocaust in the artist's cultural and moral imagination, political
>controversy, literature, sacred texts, and myth through these
>captivating works that render image and text in hitherto unimagined
>forms. Other essays might consider the important role of autobiography
>in the graphic novel and the role of the graphic novel in the Jewish
>Studies classroom. This list is by no means exhaustive; other relevant
>theoretical, pedagogical, or cultural approaches will be considered.
>Authors are encouraged to use images whenever appropriate but they are
>individually responsible for all necessary permissions. Papers from all
>disciplines, or interdisciplinary submissions (whether focused on single
>works or comparative discussions), are welcomed. Send brief bios along
>with abstracts (300 words) or complete essays that follow the current
>edition of the MLA Style Manual to both Ranen Omer-Sherman
>[log in to unmask] and Samantha Baskind [log in to unmask] by
>11/30/06.

*******************
The German Studies Call for Papers List
Editor: Stefani Engelstein
Assistant Editor:  Megan McKinstry
Sponsored by the University of Missouri
Info available at: http://www.missouri.edu/~graswww/resources/gerlistserv.html