Print

Print


>
>Subject: CFP: Concentric: Literary and Cultural 
>Studies (8/31/06 & 2/23/07; journal issue)
>From: "[big5]  ߞ„¸©™" <[log in to unmask]>
>
>   CALL FOR PAPERS
>   Concentric: Literary and Cultural Studies
>
>
>   Concentric: Literary and Cultural Studies is 
>inviting submissions for its forthcoming issues. 
>We encourage contributions from both Taiwan and 
>international communities addressing our special 
>topics; articles on other aspects of literature 
>and culture are also welcome. If your manuscript 
>is intended as a special topic submission, 
>please so indicate. All correspondence should be 
>addressed to Editor, Concentric: Literary and 
>Cultural Studies, Department of English, 
>National Taiwan Normal University, 162 Hoping 
>East Road, Section 1, Taipei 106, Taiwan. 
>[e-mail: concentric.lit @deps.ntnu.edu.tw]
>
>   Forthcoming Special Topics
>
>   Vol. 33 No. 1: °ßThe Gothic Revisited°® (January 2007)
>   Guest Editor:  Ying-hsiung Chou (©P‚^Ø)
>                                      Wu Feng Institute of Technology
>   Deadline for Submissions: August 31, 2006
>   The Gothic revival of recent years has meant a 
>move from the purely °ßliterary°® domain into 
>various critical and theoretical fields of 
>study, including those concerned with ethnicity, 
>imperialism, gender, cinema, fashion, music, 
>science and technology. By virtue of their 
>hybrid nature, recent Gothic studies have been 
>able to shed new light on certain °ßuncanny°® 
>aspects, to which we have hitherto been 
>oblivious, not just of gothic fiction and films 
>but of life itself. There remain, however, 
>important questions to be raised with regard to 
>°ßgothicity°® as both a structure of thinking 
>and a way of telling, questions about repression 
>and transgression in a (post)modern context. 
>Specifically, how does the Gothic speak to the 
>Other°Xtheoretically, historically, 
>transculturally? How does it narrate our 
>situatedness in this age of alienation, racism, 
>and °ßclashes of civilization°®? And how can it 
>adapt itself to different modern and/or 
>postmodern social formations not only
>  through horror, terror and fear but also 
>through configurations of power and empowerment? 
>Particularly welcome, then, are discussions of 
>the ways in which historical and cultural 
>disenfranchisement, and resistance in various 
>generic and social contexts, may be read in 
>terms of the Gothic, as well as original 
>investigations into how the Gothic might think 
>and articulate that which characterizes our life 
>today as (post)modern.
>
>   Vol. 33 No. 2: °ßEthics and Ethnicity°® (July 2007)
>   Deadline for Submissions: February 23, 2007
>
>   2007 marks the quadricentennial of the 
>establishment of Jamestown in the Colony of 
>Virginia, as the making of The New World, a 
>Hollywood version of the Europeans°¶ arrival, 
>attempts to rekindle the historical moment. Also 
>in 1607, Matteo Ricci°¶s translation of 
>Cosmological Epitome was published in China. 
>Both the European settlement and the Jesuit°¶s 
>translation find a connection in the Renaissance 
>play first performed a year earlier. The 
>eponymous protagonist of Macbeth (1606), a 
>tragic hero consumed by ambition, seems to 
>endure a fate that characterizes both the 
>settlement in the West and the translation in 
>the East.
>
>   On the eve of the quadricentennial anniversary 
>of both the Jamestown settlement and Matteo 
>Ricci°¶s translation, Concentric invites 
>submissions that bear witness to the 
>entanglement of °ßethics and ethnicity.°® While 
>°ßethics°® may concern itself with irreducible 
>otherness, °ßethnicity°® connotes the apartness 
>of a stranger, a foreigner, or an immigrant. 
>That is to say, °ßethics°® becomes an issue when 
>°ßethnicity°® emerges. Odd couple though they 
>are, the translation between ethics and 
>ethnicity, across the wide world that both 
>separated and linked Jamestown and the East, is 
>the contested terrain of this special issue, 
>promising a timely reflection on our worlds.
>
>   Manuscript Submission
>   1.            Manuscripts should be submitted 
>in English. Please send the manuscript, an 
>abstract, a list of keywords, and a vita as 
>Word-attachments to concentric.lit 
>@deps.ntnu.edu.tw. Alternatively, please mail us 
>two hard copies and an IBM-compatible diskette 
>copy. Concentric will acknowledge receipt of the 
>submission but will not return it after review.
>   2.            Manuscripts should be prepared 
>according to the latest edition of the MLA 
>Handbook for Writers of Research Papers. Except 
>for footnotes in single space, manuscripts must 
>be double-spaced, typeset in 12-point Times New 
>Roman.
>   3.            To facilitate the Journal°¶s 
>anonymous refereeing process, there must be no 
>indication of personal identity or institutional 
>affiliation in the manuscript proper. The name 
>and institution of the author should appear on a 
>separate title page or in the vita. The author 
>may cite his/her previous works, but only in the 
>third person.
>   4.            The Journal will not consider 
>for publication manuscripts being simultaneously 
>submitted elsewhere.
>   5.            If the paper has been published 
>or submitted elsewhere in a language other than 
>English (e.g., Chinese), please make available 
>two copies of the non-English version. 
>Concentric may not consider submissions already 
>available in other languages.
>   6.            One copy of the Journal and 
>fifteen off-prints of the article will be 
>provided to the author(s) on publication.
>   7.            It is the Journal°¶s policy to 
>require assignment of copyrights form by all 
>authors.
>

*******************
The German Studies Call for Papers List
Editor: Stefani Engelstein
Assistant Editor:  Megan McKinstry
Sponsored by the University of Missouri
Info available at: http://www.missouri.edu/~graswww/resources/gerlistserv.html