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>
>From: John BAK <[log in to unmask]>
>
>Subject: CFP: Left/Out: 'Texts' and their 
>'Ur-Texts' (France) (9/15/06; 3/18/07-3/19/07)
>
>Call for Papers
>
>"Left/Out: 'Texts' and their 'Ur-texts'"
>
>International Conference
>
>18 - 19 mars 2007
>
>Universit╚ Nancy 2, France
>
>
>More and more the public is being given access to material that was 
>never originally meant for its eyes. From film extras added to 
>collectorÝs edition DVDs to sensitive governmental files declassified 
>by laws like the Freedom of Information Act, this once-restricted 
>material has significantly contributed to our questioning not only the 
>process behind a ýtextÝsţ construction but also its universal claim of 
>being whole/complete/finished upon publication. For example, DVDs that 
>include special features which contain original material edited out of 
>final production challenge us to weigh our initial response to the 
>completed film or TV series against this unseen footage (itself 
>edited) which, if reinserted, potentially alters the textÝs controlled 
>message. Films and DVDs are, of course, not the only ýtextsţ affected 
>by deletions and post-production emendations such as these. Other 
>potential areas of study could include (but are not limited to):
>
>´	the genetic reading of a literary textÝs 
>manuscripts and or/variorum edition
>´	the comparative analysis of a paintingÝs studies
>´	the parallel reading of a filmÝs or TV seriesÝ dialogue with its 
>subtitles or its dubbing
>´	a comparative reading of an authorÝs bilingual editions
>´	a reconstructive examination of declassified information.
>
>All are examples of how the study of discarded textual material 
>practiced on a pluridisciplanary level with interdisciplinary methods 
>promotes the establishment of a non-teleological grammar that not only 
>challenges existing practices of valuing product over process but 
>undermines all categorical distinctions between the two terms. In 
>other words, studying the fragments ýleft outţ of a text, either 
>separately as texts in and of themselves or in relation to the larger 
>work from which they were discarded, would serve to demonstrate how 
>the process is the product. One hypothesis behind the reasons for 
>these cuts is that they are politically determined by ýconservativeţ 
>motives (in the broader sense of the word: conserve, conservatism, 
>conservation, etc.) and that the lost material often contains the very 
>seeds of the larger textÝs deconstruction, which justify their 
>exclusion.
>
>While research such as this already exists in each of the individual 
>fields mentioned, the colloquium proposes to address the phenomenon 
>collectively, examining how ýleft outţ material in a variety of fields 
>and disciplines reshapes a final text, determines the nature of its 
>self- or state-imposed expurgation, and establishes a non-teleological 
>theory that values its process as product. What does the editing out 
>or re-insertion of ýnewţ material into a ýtextţ that has already 
>become fixed for many readers/viewers change in our analysis of it, 
>indeed in our analytical methods in general? Are there any consistent 
>similarities in the types of material that are cut, despite the genre? 
>Can studying the editorial process in various disciplines help us 
>construct a ýtheoretical modelţ of interdisciplinarity that studies 
>not only the links between disparate fields but also the researcherÝs 
>tools with which to study them? While the immediate goal of the 
>colloquium would be to examine the gestalt of textual construction, 
>its more extended goal would be see if common ground can be found 
>between the interdisciplinary object and subjectˇbetween those of us 
>who study a text using different disciplines and those of us from 
>different disciplines studying a textˇand how this may help us prepare 
>for an academic future wherein interdisciplinary theory and practice 
>seem poised to become the standard of scientific inquiry more than the 
>exception.
>
>Half-hour presentations can be written in English or in French. A 
>selection of extended presentations based on the conference 
>proceedings will be published in ýRegards crois╚s sur le monde 
>Anglophone,ţ by the Presses Universitaires de Nancy. Please send your 
>proposals (title and 500-word abstract) or completed papers by email 
>attachment to John S. Bak ([log in to unmask]) before 15 
>September 2006.
>
>
>Organizing committee:
>
>John S. Bak
>Nathalie Coll╚-Bak
>Monica Girard
>Rachel Hutchins-Viroux
>David Ten-Eyck
>Jeremy Tranmer

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